Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

we assume one letter is exchanged to another letter( M -> |V| , C -> ( ). we don't know each letter to will be converted (this mean we don't know ( M -> |V| , C -> ( ) if there two strings and maximum number to be converted this kind of letter. and there is no rules for matching.

if it is bounded, the result is 1 otherwise 0.

at first my solution is like this C source

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#define MAXSTRING 100

/**
Test input

2
3
mississippi
nni55i55ippi
2
foobar
|=o08ar


**/

int main() {   // declare main function
    int test,t; // test number
    int i,j; // input loop variant
    int lv1, lv2, lv3; // loop variant
    int lenString1, lenString2; // length of string
    int maximum; // maximum value for LEET
    char letter; // check letters

    char c1, c2;


    scanf("%d\n", &t); // take test case


    for(test = 0; test < t ; test ++) {
        char string1[MAXSTRING]={0,}, string2[MAXSTRING]={0,};
        int count1 = 0;
        int result = 0;
        int flipped = 0;

        scanf("%d\n", &maximum);
        for (i = 0; (c1 = getchar()) != '\n'; i++) { // make original string
            string1[i] = c1;
        }
        for (j = 0; (c2 = getchar()) != '\n'; j++) { // make LEET string
            string2[j] = c2;
        }              
        lenString1 = strlen(string1);
        lenString2 = strlen(string2);

        if(lenString1 == 1 && string1[0] != string2[0]) { count1 = 1; }
        else {
        for (lv1 = 0; lv1 < lenString1; lv1++){
            for (lv2 = lv1; lv2 < lenString2 ; lv2++) {
                if(string1[lv1+1] == string2[lv2] && string1[lv1] != string2[lv2-1]) {
                    letter = string2[lv2-1];
                    for(lv3 = (lv1)+1; lv3 < lenString1; lv3++) {
                        if(string1[lv3] == string1[lv1] && string2[lv3] == letter) { flipped = 1; break;}
                        else { flipped = 0;}
                    }
                    count1++;
                    break;
                }
                if(flipped == 1) { break;}
                else {flipped = 0;}
            }
        }
        if(count1 > maximum) {result = 0;}
        else {result = 1; }
        }
        printf("%d\n", count1);
        printf("%d\n", result);

    }
    return 0;

}

But it doesn't work. because this kind of counterexample if maximum is 3, and this two kind of strings.

ACMICPC -> 4(|V|I(|>(

I think the count1 is = 4, but it counts 1.

How to solve this kind of problem??

share|improve this question
    
Your question is very vague... what is your algorithm trying to do exactly? ahhh is it a leet stringifier? –  Ahmed Masud Nov 20 '11 at 4:48
    
Yes but we don't know any rules for leet stringfier –  Silvester Nov 20 '11 at 4:51
    
Okay, from what I can guage, you want to create leet strings, use some standard set of rules for that. You can find a list on Wikipedia. Although if you want to reverse it without knowing any convention, you'll simply have to create lists of all possible conversions for each letter, and lookup for matches.. –  darnir Nov 20 '11 at 4:56
    
I want to check what the number of leet character in my changed text. I don't use any rule for this text. –  Silvester Nov 20 '11 at 4:58
    
Just a heads up! I think your program will generate a segmentation fault at the first iteration (lv1 = lv2 = 0) if string1[1] == string2[0] as it will then look for string2[-1]. –  Niklas Hansson Nov 20 '11 at 8:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is counting the characters that are equal. In your counterexample, you have a single I in both strings, thus count1 is 1.

In the foobar example, you have A and R and count1 = 2. (I think you mistyped a 0 in the LEET version so I don't count the Os, right?) In the mississippi, you have I and P and count1 = 2.

You are not so far off though. What you could do is count the characters that are alike and subtract that count from the number of unique characters in the original string. That would give you the number of converted characters.


Just a heads up! I think your program will generate a segmentation fault at the first iteration (lv1 = lv2 = 0) if string1[1] == string2[0] as it will then look for string2[-1].

share|improve this answer
    
Added solution suggestion. –  Niklas Hansson Nov 20 '11 at 9:35
    
No, if it changed once, count1 + 1 –  Silvester Nov 20 '11 at 11:05
    
Could you please clarify? –  Niklas Hansson Nov 20 '11 at 11:13
    
kind of foobar case, foobar is changed to |=o08ar. o is changed once, so it counted to count1 ++; –  Silvester Nov 20 '11 at 11:21
    
and my solution is not occurs segmentation fault. because when it found string1[lv1+1] == string2[lv2] with different character, it is always on lv2 > 1 –  Silvester Nov 20 '11 at 11:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.