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I like lists, because they are very easy to use and manage. However, I have a need for a list of multiple elements, like records.

I am new to C#, and appreciate all assistance! (Stackoverflow rocks!)

Consider this straightforward, working example of a single element list, it works great:

public static List<string> GetCities()
{
  List<string> cities = new List<string>();
  cities.Add("Istanbul");
  cities.Add("Athens");
  cities.Add("Sofia");
  return cities;
}

If I want the list to have two properties for each record, how would I do it? (As an array?)

E.g. what is the real code for this pseudo code?:

public static List<string[2]> GetCities()
{
  List<string> cities = new List<string>();
  cities.Name,Country.Add("Istanbul","Turkey");
  cities.Name,Country.Add("Athens","Greece");
  cities.Name,Country.Add("Sofia","Bulgaria");
  return cities;
}

Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A List<T> can hold instances of any type - so you can just create a custom class to hold all the properties you want:

public class City
{
   public string Name {get;set;}
   public string Country {get;set;}
}

...

public List<City> GetCities()
{
   List<City> cities = new List<City>();
   cities.Add(new City() { Name = "Istanbul", Country = "Turkey" });
   return cities;
}
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2  
Jonesome is new to C#, so I'd like to mention that this (correct) answer also uses Auto-implemented Properties, which are very handy. Edit: Though what he'd be wanting appears to be a Country class that has a Name and a List<string> Cities (or some such) –  Chris Walsh Nov 20 '11 at 5:16
    
Thank you! This works great! Chris, thx for the tip. I read the reference you pointed to, and I (largely) get it. –  Jonesome Nov 20 '11 at 18:26
public class City
{
    public City(string name, string country)
    {
        Name = name;
        Country = country;
    }

    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public string Country { get; private set; }
}

public List<City> GetCities()
{
    return new List<City>{
        new City("Istanbul", "Turkey"),
        new City("Athens", "Greece"),
        new City("Sofia", "Bulgaria")
    };
}

If you don't really need a list, and it is unlikely that you do, you can make the return type IEnumerable<City>, which is more generic. You can still return a list, but you could also do this:

public IEnumerable<City> GetCities()
{
    yield return new City("Istanbul", "Turkey"),
    yield return new City("Athens", "Greece"),
    yield return new City("Sofia", "Bulgaria")
}

If then you were to loop over cities until you find the first city in Turkey, for example, or the first city that starts with the letter I, you wouldn't have to instantiate all cities, as you would with a list. Instead, the first City would be instantiated and evaluated, and only if further evaluation is required would subsequent City objects be instantiated.

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1  
Your answer is more complete! Good job! –  jherax Jun 25 '14 at 18:53

For doing things on the fly, you can use Tuples (in .NET 4.0):

List<Tuple<string,string>> myShinyList = new List<Tuple<string,string>> {
    Tuple.Create("Istanbul","Turkey"),
    Tuple.Create("Athens","Greece"),
    Tuple.Create("Sofia","Bulgaria")
}
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