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This question might be silly, but I want to know, if a copy constructor is invoked when a pointer to an object is returned by a function? Also,consider following:

A* a1 = new A(); 
A* a = a1.GetPointer();

A* GetPoineter()
{

.....
return new A();
}

so does

A* a = a1.GetPointer(); 

call copy constructor?

also if I delete a, will it delete the address pointed by a1 also?

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1  
Purely semantical, nothing really major: GetPointer() implies returning a pointer to an existing object from some pool. GetNewObject() conveys that it's returning a newly allocated object. –  Assaf Levy Nov 20 '11 at 7:13
    
What happens if GetPointer(), just returns the pointer from some pool, now if i do delete a, will it not lead to a dangling pointer somewhere? –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:17
    
Correct. Generally, he (the pool manager) who creates the object should be the one deleting it. Unless you're using smart pointers (std::unique_ptr for example). –  Assaf Levy Nov 20 '11 at 7:25
    
so If the poolmanager is deleting the object, then I need not perform delete a, is it?(again leading to dangling pointer...)? –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:28
    
Yes that's right. –  Assaf Levy Nov 20 '11 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, it does not call the copy constructor since you are returning the address of the object, not the object itself.

delete a; will only delete the object allocated in the GetPoineter function. a1 is untouched since it points to a completely different object.

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Suppose This function just returns pointer(allocated somewhere else), then what happens? A* GetPoineter() { ..... return A; –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:12

so does A* a = a1.GetPointer(); calls copy constructor?

No.
In your case you are not returning an object but just address of an object so it does not result in copy constructor call.
In case when you are returning Objects, It depends on the compiler.
Modern day compilers are smart enough to prevent the additional call to copy constructor by using Return Value Optimization(RVO) and Named Return Value Optimization(NRVO).

Also i I delete a, will it delete the address pointed by a1 also?

No it won't.
If you just delete a then your code will result in memory leak, because you still did not deallocate memory allocated to a1. Both have been explicitly allocated dynamic memory separately, So both must be deallocated separately.

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Suppose This function just returns pointer(allocated somewhere else), then what happens? A* GetPoineter() { ..... return A; –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:15
    
@Yogi: If you return pointer there is no copy of the object, there is copy of the pointer,which does not call Copy Constructor.If the memory for object whose address u return is on stack, then it results in Undefined Behavior,because the object is destroyed once function returns and pointer you returned points to something invalid. –  Alok Save Nov 20 '11 at 7:16
    
Consider this A* GetPoineter() { a2 = new A; return a2; } now if I do delete a, will it lead to a2 dangling? –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:18
    
@Yogi: No a2 is not dangling now. You allocate it dynamically and return the pointer to that memory. Once you delete a, it will delete the memory allocated to a2 because a and a2 would point to the memory location. –  Alok Save Nov 20 '11 at 7:22
    
Consider this A* GetPoineter() { a2 = new A; return a2; } now if I do delete a, will it lead to a2 dangling(a2 is classs member)?or undefined behaviour(if a2 is local to GetPointer?) –  Yogi Nov 20 '11 at 7:26

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