Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an xml file with some placeholder if you like.I need to read it and searchReplace the placeholders.Each placeholder is unique. I thought of using this method rather than xpath as I have never used it and the xml file is very deep and complex.Thought reading in a string and then replace should do the trick. Am I missing something obvious?

Why is below not searching and replacing?

  using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(path))
        {
            string content = reader.ReadToEnd();
            reader.Close();

            content.Replace("FirstReplace", "test1");
            content.Replace("SecondReplace", "test2");
            content.Replace("ThirdReplace", "test3");
            content.Replace("FourthReplace", "test4");
            content.Replace("FifthReplace", "test5");

            using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(filePath))
            {
                writer.WriteLine(content);
                writer.Close();
            }
        }

Any suggestions

share|improve this question
    
+1 for using String.Replace as the simplest approach that would work –  sq33G Nov 20 '11 at 10:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's because strings are immutable in .NET and the Replace method returns a new string instance as result. It does not modify the original string. So:

content = content
    .Replace("FirstReplace", "test1")
    .Replace("SecondReplace", "test2")
    .Replace("ThirdReplace", "test3")
    .Replace("FourthReplace", "test4")
    .Replace("FifthReplace", "test5");

Of course if you have lots of replacing to do in tight loops, many string allocations could start to hurt the performance and it is where StringBuilder comes handy:

var sb = new StringBuilder(content);
    .Replace("FirstReplace", "test1")
    .Replace("SecondReplace", "test2")
    .Replace("ThirdReplace", "test3")
    .Replace("FourthReplace", "test4")
    .Replace("FifthReplace", "test5");
content = sb.ToString();

or to simplify your code a little and get read of those stream readers/writers:

File.WriteAllText(
    filePath, 
    File.ReadAllText(path)
        .Replace("FirstReplace", "test1")
        .Replace("SecondReplace", "test2")
        .Replace("ThirdReplace", "test3")
        .Replace("FourthReplace", "test4")
        .Replace("FifthReplace", "test5")
);
share|improve this answer
    
@Dimitrov That worked a treat and very simple.There is no dispose involved here is there?On another note what is the fastest way to read a directory with thousand of files inside.Only interested in their name. –  user9969 Nov 20 '11 at 10:22
    
@user231465, in the second example the Dispose method is internally handled by the WriteAllText and ReadAllText methods so you don't have to worry about it. As far as your second question is concerned, I don't quite understand what do you mean by ` read a directory with thousand of files inside`. Files are normally stored on a file system. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 20 '11 at 10:26
    
@Dimitrov Sorry for been not clear.Forget the question about the folders.In your example with the StringBuilder is that inside a using statement as x my question? –  user9969 Nov 20 '11 at 10:30
    
@user231465, yes, because the content variable is available inside this using statement. But it could also be used with the WriteAllText and ReadAllText methods. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 20 '11 at 10:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.