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I need to use $GLOBALS['db'] in my classes ($db is defined in my index.php), but I don't want to use $GLOBALS['db'] when I have to call it.

I wrote this code at the beginning of my classes :

class ClassName
{
    var $db;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->db = $GLOBALS['db'];
    }

    public function test()
    {
        $val = $this->db->oneValue('SELECT first_name FROM users LIMIT 0, 1');
        echo $val->first_name;
    }
}

But I'm not enjoying this; I prefer to use directly $db in my code. Is there a solution to be able to call $GLOBALS['db'] by $db?

share|improve this question
5  
This is quite the antipattern. Conside using IoC/DI: public function __construct($db) { $this->db = $db; } –  knittl Nov 20 '11 at 12:56
    
The OP doesn't really explain why he MUST use $GLOBAL, even a global singleton would be less evil! –  James Butler Nov 20 '11 at 13:01
    
you don't like this single call in the coinstructor or don't like $this->db instead of $db? –  Your Common Sense Nov 20 '11 at 13:02
4  
also var is deprecated use public|private|protected –  Lawrence Cherone Nov 20 '11 at 13:02
    
Thanks :). And @LawrenceCherone: thank you, I'll do that! –  Yoone Nov 20 '11 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Simples, just inject in the constructor or a setter method: (I'm assuming $db is an object here, not an array of connection parameters etc)

class ClassName
   {
   protected $db;

   public function __construct($db)
   {
       $this->setConnection($db);
       //Any other constructor things you want to happen...
   }

   /*
    * This is just here for convenience, this could be protected if you only want to set 
    * the db connection via the constructor
    */
   public function setConnection($db)
   {
       $this->db = $db;
   }    

   public function test()
   {
       $val = $this->db->oneValue('SELECT first_name FROM users LIMIT 0, 1');
       echo $val->first_name;
   }
}

As mentioned in some comments above, this is a form of dependency injection which will give you more ability to re-use code inside your project (A Good Thing TM).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answering my question so fast. Can I make something like class ClassName extends Database and set the connection in the Database class? I would access my function by $this->dbOneValue() for example. Is it a good idea? –  Yoone Nov 20 '11 at 13:22
    
i personally hate it to pass the argument $dbh through constructor everytime i want to use it. –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Nov 20 '11 at 13:24
    
You can have your class extend a generic DB class, however you would still need to set the $db explicitly when you created a new ClassName as PHP uses classical inheritance, not Prototypal like Javascript. All the functions you create in the generic DB class will be accessible in the 'ClassName' class. Does that help? –  James Butler Nov 20 '11 at 13:27
    
@IbrahimAzharArmar, thats where factories and DI containers, Service Locators etc etc can come in handy but they are a little outside the scope of the question/answer. –  James Butler Nov 20 '11 at 13:28
    
@JamesButler thanks a lot, it really helps! –  Yoone Nov 20 '11 at 13:34

I prefer using singleton pattern for databases.

this is the DB class i am using for my app.

class Database {

    protected static $_dbh;
    const HOST = 'localhost';
    const DATABASE = 'dbname';
    const USERNAME = 'username';
    const PASSWORD = 'password';

    private function __construct() { }

    public static function getInstance() {
        if(!isset($_dbh)) {
            try {
                #Connection String.
                self::$_dbh = new PDO('mysql:host='.self::HOST.';dbname='.self::DATABASE,self::USERNAME,self::PASSWORD);
                self::$_dbh->setAttribute( PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
            } catch(PDOException $e) {
                #Print Errors.
                echo $e->getMessage();
            }
        }
        return self::$_dbh;
    }
}

as i am using singleton pattern the connection will be re-used. you can now use the connection everywhere in your app by calling static connection method i.e

class ClassName
{
    protected static $_dbh;

    public function __construct() {
        self::$_dbh = Database::getInstance();
    }

    public function test() {
        $sth = self::$_dbh->query('SELECT first_name FROM users LIMIT 0, 1');
        $row = $sth->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
        echo $row['first_name'];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
SINGLETON ANTI-PATTERN USAGE ALERT... This gives you no ability to (re)configure you database connection without changing code, and it also limits you to only one connection (not necessarily a bad thing), unless you copy-paste this into another singleton class (thus breaking DRY). Also, it means you are putting you database credentials into source control, which should be avoided. Also Unit Testing with singletons is a nightmare. –  James Butler Nov 20 '11 at 13:31
    
@JamesButler: Unit testing with singletons is not a nightmare in 2011; stop regurgitating the same old tired nonsense. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 20 '11 at 13:39
    
Ok - valid point, its a nightmare in the pre "late static binding" era, but so many hosting companies are still yet to get beyond PHP 5.2, and I feel the OP is likely to be constrained by such considerations. –  James Butler Nov 20 '11 at 13:46
    
well, i am not sure if someone uses or create more than one database connection in an app unless they have a solid reason to do so. and i guess the OP was using the global variable $GLOBALS['db'] for the same reason. –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Nov 20 '11 at 13:49

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