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I would like the below ICollection property in one of my data classes (let's call it "Foo")

public class Foo
{
    [Key]
    public int FooId { get; set; }
    public string SomeValueOrOther { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<string> AllowedBars { get; set; }
}

I can add the string values when using the entity context, but they don't "go anywhere". In other words, no table is generated to represent this relationship and therefore no values are saved. What I would expect is a table with two columns, one for "FooId" and one for "AllowedBar" and for EF to map this to the collection automatically (as it does in with complex types).

As this doesn't happen, I've had to create a class called "FooAllowedBar" with the two properties I've described above.

This displeases me because it's the only "join" type class I have in the entire project. It works, of course, so one box is ticked, but does anybody know of a way to get EF to generate a table for the string collection relationship? (Or int, or datetime etc etc)

It may well be, from the little info that's out there on EF (still!) that this type of functionality is not (yet) supported. By I'd just like to get close to a definitive answer.

Many thanks in advance, Rob

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

EF can only work with entity classes. Each entity class must have defined primary key so the minimum in your scenario is:

public class StringData
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Data { get; set; }
}

or worse

public class StringData
{
    [Key]
    public string Data { get; set; }
}

Now you can define collection of StringData to map it as related table:

public virtual ICollection<StringData> AllowedBars { get; set; }
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1  
Thanks Ladislav - I was secretly hoping you might answer.. and you did! Thanks man. "EF can only work with entity classes" - that's all I needed to know. Do you think it might be an idea for this type of feature to be added though? I'm often coming across the need for a simple string or int collection as part of an EF POCO. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Nov 21 '11 at 13:29
    
@Ladislav Is there anyway to extend EF to provide a custom mapper. So that could transform the collection myself? Or maybe an attribute that I can add that EF will call? –  uriDium Oct 15 '13 at 7:42
    
Note: the resulting table will get a foreign key column for every property of type ICollection<StringData> in any entity in your context. –  Matthijs Wessels Sep 15 at 15:39

I know this is not best practice in all cases, but I think there are cases where storing a comma seperated list of your array in a column is a good way to solve this problem.

Conditions include:

  • The list is not going to be long
  • You don't need to search for entities based on the values in that list

It could also be a good idea if one entity has multiple string lists in it that would create lots of joins.

In those cases I would solve it by having two properties for the list. One being the comma seperated list used by EF and the other a list that you can use when accessing the items in the list like this:

[NotMapped]
public List<String> AllowedBars { get; set; }

/// <summary>
/// Comma seperated list of AllowedBars
/// </summary>
public String AllowedBarsList
{
    get { return String.Join(",", AllowedBars); }
    set
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value))
        {
            AllowedBars.Clear();
        }
        else
        {
            AllowedBars = value.Split(',').ToList();
        }
    }
}

You need to initialise AllowedBars to be an empty list in the constructor.

You don't need to use the [NotMapped] attribute as this collection won't be used anyway, but I think it makes the intent clearer.

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Quite like that :) Feels a bit dirty but I'm not here to judge. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Aug 12 at 7:43
    
Ideally the String prop AllowedBarsList would be a hidden implementation detail, but that wouldn't work with EF. So, it is a bit dirty. –  Richard Garside Aug 12 at 10:57
1  
Good dirty though ;) –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Aug 12 at 11:35

This won't work. The reason for this is, that with relational databases, you can't really save arrays or a collection of things in fields. And since every property in your class will be mapped to a database-field, the only way to collections is via a one to many relationship. So you need the join. So it's not really a limitation of EF, but of relational databases.

There are people that solve that by saving XML or CSV to string fields in the table. But this is considered very bad style, so don't do it. I recommend you just have to accept the join. It's not hurting anyone anyway.

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I know what you're saying, but I'm not trying to save a string array into a single column (an MSSQL db could not do this of course), I'm trying to save multiple rows in a single table. I think the answer is "it's just not meant to do that" (without explicity writing the classes for the join). –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Nov 20 '11 at 14:32

You have not define your class tables appropriately. Suppose you have two Tables Foo and FooBar. And there is a one-to-many relationship b/w Foo and FooBar. Then you will define the classes as below.

Foo

public class Foo
{
    public int FooId { get; set; }
    public string SomeValue { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<FooBar> FooBars { get; set; } 
}

FooBar

public class FooBar
{
    public int FooBarId { get; set; }
    public string SomeProperty { get; set; }
    public int FooId { get; set; }

    public virtual Foo Foo { get; set; } 
}

This will create two tables with Foo having two columns and FooBar having 3 columns including the FooId depicting one-to-many between Foo and FooBars

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1  
This is what I have done and am trying to avoid, but Kudos for naming something "Foo foo".. :) –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Nov 20 '11 at 14:31

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