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I'm new to using Google Spreadsheets and even spreadsheets altogether, so I'm really unsure about stuff. I've been trying to make a kind of work-schedule where I enter the times I've been working in the month, and it calculates amount of normal hours, hours with 50% extra pay, 100% extra pay,additonal pay for nightwork, weekend, etc, etc

Here's the link to the document.

I was trying to add the date in the column row at column A to A1 and figure out if the current row is a sunday, but it threw back a parseerror no matter what I did. Then I tried a simple formula like this"=date(2011,11,20)" in O4 which I thought would work but it didn't. I then tried entering the very same formula in another document and it works in that one. Why is that? I'm really confused and annoyed here, heh. Thanks in advance!

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Could this be an issue of locale? 2011,11,20 could be mistaken as a misformatted number (integral part 2011, fractional part 11,20 which would of course be a parse error). To see if this is so, you could try separating the arguments using semicolon: =date(2011;11;20) or go to File, Spreadsheet settings, and change the locale of your spreadsheet. –  MετάEd Nov 21 '11 at 1:17
    
Alright, I'll check when i get home.. It's weird though I've nevr changed locale or anything, and like I said, it works in one document but not the other –  Clox Nov 21 '11 at 16:33
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1 Answer 1

It is a locale issue but for me in connection with your formulae rather than your date. I believe Google Spreadsheet prefers ; as the parameter separator but is kind enough to accept , as well (though perhaps not in all regions). A consequence for me is that 'a half' expressed as 0,5 gave rise to an error. On the other hand for me =date(2011,11,20) did not give me the error you saw (some of the time).

My deduction is that =date(2011;11;20) should work for you and, I speculate, Google Spreadsheet decides what delimiters it will accept 'on the fly'. Maybe it waits to see which convention is first appropriate and then locks that sheet to that convention?

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