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When defining a member function pointer that points to a function inherited privately from a base class, how would you declare it?

eg..

// class B defined here

class A; //forward dec

typedef void (B::*fnc_ptr)(); // This? or..
typedef void (A::*fnc_ptr)(); // this...?

class A: private B{
   public:
      A(): ptr(0){};
      ~A(){};

      using B::fnc;

      void setandcall(){
           ptr = &fnc;
           (*ptr)();
      }

      fnc_ptr ptr;
};
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have not attached the error you are getting. I think your real error might be that both

typedef (B::*fnc_ptr)(); // This? or..
typedef (A::*fnc_ptr)(); // this...?

of your choices don't have a return type specified.

That being said both of your constructs will work. You problem is that when you invoke a non static member function you need to pass this parameter. The private inheritance only affects consumers of A not A itself.

class B
{
public:
    void fnc();

};


typedef void (B::*fnc_ptr)(); // This? or..

class A: private B{



   public:
      A(): ptr(0){};
      ~A(){};


      void setandcall(){
          ptr = &B::fnc;
          (this->*fnc)();
      }

      fnc_ptr ptr;
};
share|improve this answer
    
No return type was a typo - its editted now. I haven't compiled it i just wondered what I should do in this situation? – user965369 Nov 20 '11 at 15:07
    
this->fnc() should be (this->*fnc)(). – Charles Bailey Nov 20 '11 at 15:39
    
@Charles updated the answer – parapura rajkumar Nov 20 '11 at 15:46

It doesn't matter. You have to explicitly specify &A::fnc or &B::fnc when you form a pointer to member, though. &fnc is not valid.

If fnc is inherited from B then &A::fnc has type void (B::*)() but it is safe to convert to void (A::*)() as a function that operates on the base class can safely operate on an instance of a derived class. The conversion the other way, however, is not safe. Obviously the conversion restricts the range of classes that you can use the pointer to member with to only objects of the derived class type.

Also, when you call it you need to use ->* or .* operators. (*ptr)() is not valid. E.g. (this->*ptr)().

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