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I've been reading the Boost C++ documentation and trying to figure out how to generate a random real number between 0 and 1, using the uniform_01 part of the library. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Based on suggestions, I'm using this code, but it generates the same random value every time.

double random01(mt19937 & generator)
{
    uniform_01<mt19937> dist(generator);
    return dist();
}

int main()
{
    mt19937 generator(time(0));
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        cout << random01(generator) << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Sorry if I wasn't clear; this question isn't solved, by my answer or any other. It's still generating the same random value each time.

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closed as not a real question by Igor Oks, Benjamin Lindley, Michael Krelin - hacker, Andrew Barber, ChrisF Nov 21 '11 at 22:44

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If this is a self-answer, you should have posted it as a question first. This solution should then have been posted as an answer later on. –  Bart Nov 20 '11 at 15:55
    
Better rewrite it as a question "how to generate a random real number between 0 and 1", and an answer below. –  Igor Oks Nov 20 '11 at 15:56
    
Will do; thank you. Is there anything else I need to do? –  Ricardo Altamirano Nov 20 '11 at 15:57
    
One last thing: mark your answer as accepted. –  01d55 Nov 20 '11 at 16:02
    
I can't accept my own answer for two days, but I will do so as soon as that elapses. –  Ricardo Altamirano Nov 20 '11 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a few 'gotcha's in this code:

  1. The random01() function does not take a reference to the generator, but rather a copy of the generator. So if you call the function multiple times with the same generator - it will produce the same value over and over again!
  2. The static uniform_01 in random01() only gets initialized on the first call to random01, so if it is ever called with a different generator, it will not use it, but rather use a reference to the first generator, which may even have been destroyed, since!

Correct would be something like following (note the & in the arguments list, for pass-by-reference, and the lack of static:

double random01(mt19937 & generator)
{
    uniform_01<mt19937> dist(generator);
    return dist();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the help; when I generate a sequence of values in a loop using that code, the value generated is the same every time. I can't post code properly in a comment, but I simply wrapped the cout statement in a for loop. –  Ricardo Altamirano Nov 20 '11 at 16:20

This is the solution I found:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <boost/random.hpp>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

using boost::mt19937;
using boost::uniform_01;

double random01(mt19937 generator)
{
    static uniform_01<mt19937> dist(generator);
    return dist();
}

int main()
{
    mt19937 generator(time(0));
    cout << random01(generator) << endl;

}

The code is slightly modified from here; hat tip to Bojan Nikolic.

I posted this as a "solution" in the hope that it helps someone, but please criticise anything you notice wrong with it. I tried to separate the seeding step from the actual generation so the twister isn't seeded every single time it generates a value.

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You can do this with c++11 stl rather than boost if you have c++11 –  Dani Nov 20 '11 at 16:00
    
Right. The version of Linux I'm using doesn't use g++ 4.6 by default (I think that's the compiler that includes much support for for c++11) and I was trying to avoid compiling g++ from the source code. –  Ricardo Altamirano Nov 20 '11 at 16:03
    
What linux is it? –  Dani Nov 20 '11 at 16:08
    
Ubuntu 11.04 x64. According to apt, it's version 4.5.2 in the repositories. I wasn't sure if that had support for C++11, and I wasn't aware of the random number functions in C++11 until this afternoon; I may investigate those later. –  Ricardo Altamirano Nov 20 '11 at 16:25
    
on my Ubuntu I always compiled gcc, its really easy on Ubuntu –  Dani Nov 20 '11 at 16:32

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