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How can I make a XSLT to transform this:

<root>
 <element>This
  <element>is</element>
 </element>
 <element>normal!</element>
 <element>This</element>
 <element>will
  <special>break here</special>
  <element>and
   <element>also
    <special>here!</special>
   </element>
  </element>
 </element>
</root>

Into this:

<root>
 <content>This is normal! This will</content>
 <special>break here</special>
 <content>and also</content>
 <special>here!</special>
</root>

Considering <special>can appear any number of times and anywhere. I think I need to process the file two times to be able to do that, but I need to do it at once.

EDIT: Just a clarification, it isn't a simple copy, the content is also transformed from one end to another (that why I thought I need two different transformations).

EDIT2: Here is the algorithm of what I want:

1) Go proccessing all elements until you find some special element, put it all so far inside <content>

2) If the next element is special put it inside <specialContent>

3) If there is something left go to step 1.

EDIT3 I changed my sample xml to make it clearer.

share|improve this question
    
depending on what kind of transformation you are looking at, it might be possible –  prusswan Nov 20 '11 at 16:49

5 Answers 5

It seems that all existing answers at this time do stumble on this XML document:

<root>
    <element>This   
        <element>is</element></element>
    <element>normal!</element>
    <element>This</element>
    <element>will   
        <special>break here</special>
        <element>and    
            <element>also     
                <special>here!</special>
            </element>
        </element>
        <element>But not here</element>
    </element>
</root>

Here is a transformation that processes it correctly:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:key name="content" match="element"
  use="generate-id((ancestor::special|preceding::special)[last()])"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
   <xsl:copy>
    <content>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="key('content', '')"/>
    </content>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="//special" />
   </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="special">
   <xsl:copy-of select="." />
   <content>
    <xsl:apply-templates select=
       "key('content', generate-id())" />
   </content>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="element">
   <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(text())" />
   <xsl:text> </xsl:text>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the XML document above, the wanted, correct result is produced:

<root>
   <content>This is normal! This will </content>
   <special>break here</special>
   <content>and also </content>
   <special>here!</special>
   <content>But not here </content>
</root>
share|improve this answer
    
This really would work, but I guess my problem is just studborn, there is too much content being transformed to keep track of everything, also I got some auto-generated content that would get lost if I use this kind of processing. I guess the solution is another XSLT (pipelining) or creating the content in a variable and using node-set() to pass it to another template... –  Luiz Borges Nov 20 '11 at 21:17
    
@LuizBorges: Yes, this processing always can be done in a separate pass. If you have problems how to do this, search the xslt tag -- there are several questions and answers how to do multi-pass processing. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 20 '11 at 21:22
    
@LuizBorges: See this example of a two-pass transformation: stackoverflow.com/questions/3678353/… –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 20 '11 at 21:31
<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="content//*[not(self::SpecialContent)]">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
</xsl:template>

should suffice.

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My bad, actually there are all kinds of transformations happening with the content, so it isn't a simple copy. –  Luiz Borges Nov 20 '11 at 16:38
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="root">
        <content>
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//content/text()[following-sibling::node()[1][self::subcontent]]" />
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//subcontent/text()[following-sibling::node()[1][self::subsubcontent]]" />         
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//subsubcontent/text()[following-sibling::node()[1][self::SpecialContent]]" />               
        </content>
        <xsl:for-each select=".//SpecialContent">
            <xsl:copy-of select="." />
        </xsl:for-each>
        <content>
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//subsubcontent/text()[preceding-sibling::node()[1][self::SpecialContent]]" />  
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//subcontent/text()[preceding-sibling::node()[1][self::subsubcontent]]" />
            <xsl:copy-of select=".//content/text()[preceding-sibling::node()[1][self::subcontent]]" />
        </content>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="text()" />
</xsl:stylesheet>

not very pretty, but should work with other transformations if any

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite, as I said, Special can be anywhere and any number of times. –  Luiz Borges Nov 20 '11 at 17:17
    
okay I saw your revised question, therefore my answer does not apply anymore –  prusswan Nov 20 '11 at 17:19

I think one way you could achieve this is to group all the element* elements by the first **special element that is either a descendant or a following element,

<xsl:key name="content" 
   match="element" 
   use="generate-id((descendant::special|following::special)[1])" />

You can then start off by matching all the speical elements in the document

 <xsl:apply-templates select="//special" />

And for each special element, you match, you can then group together all the associated element elements that have this current element as their first decendant or following element.

<content>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="key('content', generate-id())" />
</content>

So, given the following XSLT

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

   <xsl:key name="content" 
      match="element" 
      use="generate-id((descendant::special|following::special)[1])" />

   <xsl:template match="/root">
      <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="//special" />
      </xsl:copy>
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="special">
      <content>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="key('content', generate-id())" />
      </content>
      <xsl:copy-of select="." />
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="element">
      <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(text())" /><xsl:text> </xsl:text>
   </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied to you sample XML, the following is output

<root>
   <content>This is normal! This will </content>
   <special>break here</special>
   <content>and also </content>
   <special>here!</special>
</root>

(Note there is a space at the end of each content tag, but I could easily tweak the XSLT to remove this if you needed).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Dimitri answer was very good, but it would break somethings in my XSLT due to generated content and a very deep template hierarchy.

Here is the solution I end up using:

First I do all the normal processing, then I call a post-process:

<xsl:variable name="content">
   <xsl:apply-templates />
</xsl:variable>
<xsl:apply-templates select="msxsl:node-set($content)" mode="postProcess" />

In the post-process it searches for anything that is not a div with WideContent tag in its class attribute and groups the adjacent siblings inside another div, the ones with the WideContent tag are simply copied (but could as well be also group in the same manner).

<xsl:template match="/*[not(self::xhtml:div[contains(@class,'WideContent')])][preceding-sibling::*[1][self::xhtml:div[contains(@class,'WideContent')]] or position()=1]" mode="postProcess">
  <div class="NormalContent">
    <xsl:call-template name="postProcessNormalContent" />
  </div>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="postProcessNormalContent" match="/*[not(self::xhtml:div[contains(@class,'WideContent')])]" mode="postProcessNormalContent">
  <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
  <xsl:apply-templates select="following-sibling::*[1]" mode="postProcessNormalContent" />
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="xhtml:div[contains(@class,'WideContent')]" mode="postProcess">
  <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="node()" mode="postProcess" />
<xsl:template match="node()" mode="postProcessNormalContent" />

Any suggestions on how to improved that will be gladly taken.

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