Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been thinking about storing C++ lambda's lately. The standard advice you see on the Internet is to store the lambda in a std::function object. However, none of this advice ever considers the storage implications. It occurred to me that there must be some seriously black voodoo going on behind the scenes to make this work. Consider the following class that stores an integer value:

class Simple {
public:
    Simple( int value ) { puts( "Constructing simple!" ); this->value = value; }
    Simple( const Simple& rhs ) { puts( "Copying simple!" ); this->value = rhs.value; }
    Simple( Simple&& rhs ) { puts( "Moving simple!" ); this->value = rhs.value; }
    ~Simple() { puts( "Destroying simple!" ); }
    int Get() const { return this->value; }

private:
    int value;
};

Now, consider this simple program:

int main()
{
    Simple test( 5 );

    std::function<int ()> f =
        [test] ()
        {
            return test.Get();
        };

    printf( "%d\n", f() );
}

This is the output I would hope to see from this program:

Constructing simple!
Copying simple!
Moving simple!
Destroying simple!
5
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!

First, we create the value test. We create a local copy on the stack for the temporary lambda object. We then move the temporary lambda object into memory allocated by std::function. We destroy the temporary lambda. We print our output. We destroy the std::function. And finally, we destroy the test object.

Needless to say, this is not what I see. When I compile this on Visual C++ 2010 (release or debug mode), I get this output:

Constructing simple!
Copying simple!
Copying simple!
Copying simple!
Copying simple!
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!
5
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!

Holy crap that's inefficient! Not only did the compiler fail to use my move constructor, but it generated and destroyed two apparently superfluous copies of the lambda during the assignment.

So, here finally are the questions: (1) Is all this copying really necessary? (2) Is there some way to coerce the compiler into generating better code? Thanks for reading!

share|improve this question
5  
GCC gives the copy/move/destroy sequence you expected. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 20 '11 at 17:31
3  
That's good to know. I guess it means the answer to (1) is no. Hopefully future MS implementations will be better. –  Peter Ruderman Nov 20 '11 at 17:36
    
What if you add move assignment operator? –  Viktor Sehr Nov 20 '11 at 17:40
4  
I don't think it's really fair to dismiss C++11 features in VS2010 as inefficient; the respective dates should be a hint why. –  MSalters Nov 21 '11 at 8:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The standard advice you see on the Internet is to store the lambda in a std::function object. However, none of this advice ever considers the storage implications.

That's because it doesn't matter. You do not have access to the typename of the lambda. So while you can store it in its native type with auto initially, it's not leaving that scope with that type. You can't return it as that type. You can only stick it in something else. And the only "something else" C++11 provides is std::function.

So you have a choice: temporarily hold on to it with auto, locked within that scope. Or stick it in a std::function for long-term storage.

Is all this copying really necessary?

Technically? No, it is not necessary for what std::function does.

Is there some way to coerce the compiler into generating better code?

No. This isn't your compiler's fault; that's just how this particular implementation of std::function works. It could do less copying; it shouldn't have to copy more than twice (and depending on how the compiler generates the lambda, probably only once). But it does.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... I guess the only option then is to create a custom class to store the lambda (or wait for a better std::function implementation). Thanks for the info! –  Peter Ruderman Nov 20 '11 at 17:51
1  
@PeterRuderman: It's just some copying; let it go. It's not even something that happens when the std::function is copied. This is purely initialization-time. Are you really trying to store large structs in a lambda? Just use what's there, and if you profile and find an actual performance problem, fix it then. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 20 '11 at 17:58
    
Fair enough. I may be engaging in premature optimization. Nevertheless, I do think the copies are a valid concern. I've been thinking about a design that would involve continuously creating large numbers of lambda objects. It's quite likely that many of the lambdas will capture a std::string. In this case, the copies are going to be really expensive. –  Peter Ruderman Nov 20 '11 at 18:30
    
couldnt you use the type of a lambda as a template parameter (using decltype) ? –  smerlin Nov 21 '11 at 7:15
1  
@MSalters: And how exactly does this solve the problem that the person asking the question was trying to solve? You cannot store a lambda created in a function in any non-automatic (ie: not the stack) storage location without using std::function or something similar that performs type erasure. Not unless you are in fact writing a function template. And even then, the lambda member of a class would have to be declared at class scope and would therefore not be able to bind to much of anything. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 21 '11 at 9:40

I noticed the same performance problem a while ago with MSVC10 and filed a bug report at microsoft connect :
https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/649268/std-bind-and-std-function-generate-a-crazy-number-of-copy#details

The bug is closed as "fixed". With MSVC11 developer preview your code now indeed print :

Constructing simple!
Copying simple!
Moving simple!
Destroying simple!
5
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!
share|improve this answer
1  
I think I should start using VC11. Too bad they didn't get variadic templates in... –  Xeo Nov 20 '11 at 21:54
    
Great news! Thanks for letting me know. –  Peter Ruderman Nov 21 '11 at 2:22
    
@Xeo: Maybe after GCC has already implemented the entire C++11 standard... –  GManNickG Nov 22 '11 at 19:57
    
@GMan: Any possibility to get VS to compile with GCC/Clang and still get all the features of VS? :/ –  Xeo Nov 22 '11 at 20:49
    
@Xeo: Not that I know of, but that would be amazing. –  GManNickG Nov 22 '11 at 22:52

Your first problem is simply that MSVC's implementation of std::function is inefficient. With g++ 4.5.1 I get:

Constructing simple!
Copying simple!
Moving simple!
Destroying simple!
5
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!

That's still creating an extra copy though. The problem is that your lambda is capturing test by value, which is why you have all the copies. Try:

int main()
{
    Simple test( 5 );

    std::function<int ()> f =
        [&test] ()               // <-- Note added &
        {
            return test.Get();
        };

    printf( "%d\n", f() );
}

Again with g++, I now get:

Constructing simple!
5
Destroying simple!

Note that if you capture by reference then you have to ensure that test remains alive for the duration of f's lifetime, otherwise you'll be using a reference to a destroyed object, which provokes undefined behaviour. If f needs to outlive test then you have to use the pass by value version.

share|improve this answer
2  
Capturing by reference is a very bad idea if you want to store the lambda. –  ronag Nov 20 '11 at 17:43
    
As long as test is still alive (as it is in this case) then it's fine. –  Peter Alexander Nov 20 '11 at 17:45
    
I do appreciate the difference, but I am interested in persisting the lambdas. I'm contemplating a design where one part of the program would store large numbers of lambdas and another would execute them. The example is just a test program I wrote to investigate the compiler behaviour. –  Peter Ruderman Nov 20 '11 at 17:49
    
"Your first problem is simply that MSVC's support for lambdas is terrible." It has nothing to do with their support of lambdas; it's the implementation of std::function that does all the copying. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 20 '11 at 20:28
    
@NicolBolas: Fixed –  Peter Alexander Nov 20 '11 at 20:32

The problem is that std::function doesn't use move semantics and copies the lambda around while initializating. It's a bad implementation by MS.

Here is a little trick you can use to get around the problem.

template<typename T>
class move_lambda
{
    T func_;

public:
    move_lambda(T&& func) : func_(std::move(func)){}            
    move_lambda(const move_lambda& other) : func_(std::move(other.func_)){} // move on copy 
    auto operator()() -> decltype(static_cast<T>(0)()){return func_();}
};

template <typename T>
move_lambda<T> make_move_lambda(T&& func)
{
    return move_lambda<T>(std::move(func));
}

usage:

int main()
{
    Simple test( 5 );

    std::function<int ()> f(make_move_lambda(
        [test] ()
        {
            return test.Get();
        }));

    printf( "%d\n", f() );
}
share|improve this answer
    
This didn't work for me. Looking at MS's std::function implementation, it seems like it simply doesn't have a move constructor. –  Peter Ruderman Nov 20 '11 at 17:53
    
It seems the auto generated lambda classes are non-movable, strange. –  ronag Nov 20 '11 at 18:18

Using C++14, you can avoid the copies altogether:

int main()
{
    Simple test( 5 );

    std::function<int ()> f =
    [test = std::move(test)] ()
    {
        return test.Get();
    };

    printf( "%d\n", f() );
}

To produce the output:

Constructing simple!
Moving simple!
Moving simple!
Destroying simple!
5
Destroying simple!
Destroying simple!

Note the following line:

[test = std::move(test)] 

Here, the first appearance of "test" is in a different scope than the second.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.