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I've been programming for over 20 years, but have recently turned to JavaScript. Despite spending hours trawling the web, the penny hasn't yet dropped with the prototype inheritance method.

In the simplified code below, I am trying to inherit the 'name' property from the Synthesizer 'class' to the Roland 'class', but the only way I seem to be able to access it is by using 'Synth2.prototype.name' rather than by 'Synth2.name' (which returns undefined). I would like to get the approach working so that I can use 'Synth2.name', as portability is a design requirement.

I would be very grateful for any assistance.

function Synthesizer(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

function Roland(name) {
    this.prototype = new Synthesizer(name);
}

Synth1 = new Synthesizer("Analogue");
Synth2 = new Roland("Fantom G6");

document.write(Synth1.name + '<br>');
document.write(Synth2.name + '<br>');

Thanks guys! (Now updated with call to super class)...

function Synthesizer(name) {
    this.name = name;

    this.rendersound = function () {

        document.write("applying envelope to " + this.name + "<br>");

    }
}

function Roland(name) {
    Synthesizer.call(this, name);
    this.prototype = Synthesizer;

    this.Synthesizer_rendersound = this.rendersound;
    this.rendersound = function () {

        document.write("applying differential interpolation to " + this.name + "<br>");
        this.Synthesizer_rendersound(this);

    }

}

Synth1 = new Synthesizer("Analogue");
Synth2 = new Roland("Fantom G6");

document.write(Synth1.name + '<br>');
document.write(Synth2.name + '<br>');

document.write('<br>');
Synth1.rendersound();

document.write('<br>');
Synth2.rendersound();

document.write('<br>');
document.write('Synth1.prototype ' + Synth1.prototype + '<br>');
document.write('Synth2.prototype ' + Synth2.prototype + '<br>');

document.write('<br>');
document.write('Synth1.constructor ' + Synth1.constructor + '<br>');
document.write('Synth2.constructor ' + Synth2.constructor + '<br>');
share|improve this question
    
Check out javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html I think it will become more clear. –  PM5544 Nov 20 '11 at 18:45
    
Thanks for your answer, the link was informative. –  AndyC Dec 7 '11 at 18:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this by several way.

For example :

var Synthesizer = function(name){
   this.name = name;
}

function Roland(name) {
   Synthesizer.call(this, name); // you call the constructor of Synthesizer 
                                 // and force Synthesizer's this to be Roland's this
}
function clone(obj){
   var ret = {};
   for(var i in obj){ ret[i] = obj[i]; }
   return ret;
}
Roland.prototype = clone(Synthesizer.prototype); // inheritance of public functions

For Function.prototype.call : https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/Call

share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to change it to var just to call call on it. It will work either way. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Nov 20 '11 at 19:29
    
@minitech yes. I changed it during some tests I made before posting. using function Synthesizer(name)... will also work, sure! –  fflorent Nov 20 '11 at 21:07
    
Thanks guys, this is exactly what I was looking for! For the possible benefit of anyone else trying to do similar inheritance, I also managed to implement a simple way of calling to the 'Super' class function (please see update to original post). –  AndyC Dec 7 '11 at 18:34
    
I made a mistake : if you do Roland.prototype = Synthesizer.prototype;, the public methods you create with Roland (for example : Roland.prototype.foo = function(){}) will also be created for Synthesizer. And that is not what we want. That's why we must clone Synthesizer.prototype : Roland.prototype = clone(Synthesizer.prototype); is more correct. –  fflorent Jan 19 '12 at 10:29

I believe you have to set the constructor's prototype, like this:

function Synthesizer(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

function Roland(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

Roland.prototype = new Synthesizer();

Synth1 = new Synthesizer("Analogue");
Synth2 = new Roland("Fantom G6");

document.write(Synth1.name + '<br>');
document.write(Synth2.name + '<br>');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Although I was trying to make the inheritance take place in the class, rather than outside of it, in the interest of likely future porting to .NET / Java. –  AndyC Dec 7 '11 at 18:01
    
@AndyC: Just put it directly after the class. Think of it as a keyword. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Dec 7 '11 at 18:09
    
Thanks! I think JavaScript may be tooooo flexible. –  AndyC Dec 7 '11 at 18:40

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