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I am planning on using Google to download the jQuery lib for both UI and Core. My question is, do they allow me to download the CSS for it or should I have to host it myself?

Also if I use Google to load how should I load other plugins? Can I compress all plugins together or should it be its own separate file?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 479 down vote accepted

The Google AJAX Libraries API, which includes jQuery UI (currently v1.10.3), also includes popular themes as per the jQuery UI blog:

Google Ajax Libraries API (CDN)

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URLs for 1.7.2 here: blog.jqueryui.com/2009/06/jquery-ui-172 –  Sam Hasler Dec 2 '09 at 17:54
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Note that these CSS scripts are not currently compressed/minimised, meaning that you could offer reduced size versions (by about 26% according to Google's PageSpeed plugin for Firefox) from your own domain, which might be faster for your users if your connection is decent and they don't already have the file cached locally. –  Drew Noakes Jan 30 '11 at 10:15
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every time i want to find this CDN I type "jquery ui css google cdn" and this post is the most direct way to the list of them all.. I just want to thank you +1 –  mazlix Jun 9 '11 at 4:36
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@Drew: Or he might use Reducisaurus too. :) –  Alix Axel Jul 18 '11 at 0:48
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@Alix, thanks for the link. Looks like a useful service. –  Drew Noakes Jul 18 '11 at 10:44
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jQuery now has a CDN access:

code.jquery.com/ui/[version]/themes/[theme name]/jquery-ui.css


And to make this a little more easy, Here you go:

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Note that jQuery's own CDN does not support secure https connections. –  kynan Nov 25 '12 at 19:04
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It supports https now (at least since the time of this post) –  Ivan Akcheurov Jan 13 at 9:02
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Google is hosting jQueryUI css at this link https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8/themes/base/jquery.ui.all.css

If you look at this code directly, it is importing the css using @import which can be slow. You may want to factor the import into its parts to gain a slight performance benefit:

https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8/themes/base/jquery.ui.base.css https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8/themes/base/jquery.ui.theme.css

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I would think so. Why not? Wouldn't be much of a CDN w/o offering the CSS to support the script files

This link suggests that they are:

We find it particularly exciting that the jQuery UI CSS themes are now hosted on Google's Ajax Libraries CDN.

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I tried adding loading it using google load statement...would not load the css....checked it. –  coool May 4 '09 at 14:50
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here's an example url that seems to work: ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.7/themes/smoothness/… –  Scott Evernden May 4 '09 at 14:58
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You could use this one if you mean the jQuery UI css:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://code.jquery.com/ui/1.10.3/themes/smoothness/jquery-ui.css" />
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Your page load times will be a factor of googles response time.

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Not entirely true, if it's cached then it doesn't matter. Also, do you honestly think an individual's web site will have a faster response time than Google's CDN? –  Jeffrey Kevin Pry Feb 28 '12 at 23:35
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Gotta agree with @Jeffrey here. No way you'll have a faster response time than the resources that Google has. Googles "response" times will not be a factor, IMO. –  Ed DeGagne Mar 26 '12 at 20:30
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Well, it will be a factor for sure. It will simply be a positive factor as it's certainly faster to load than anything mere mortals can accomplish. –  Hejner Aug 29 '12 at 13:29
    
None of these comments seem to take into account truly instant. If you already did the download, then sure, it can easily be faster than google. Just make sure that the request is cached and already on the client before the browser goes to make the request. Then it's absolutely faster than anything you can achieve having to go across the network. –  Jeff Fischer Jun 18 at 23:23
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