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I have two strange cases where it seems like code should compile, but it doesn't. To start, consider the code below, which compiles successfully:

struct A
{
    template <class T>
    void member_func(T t)
    {
        global_func(t);
    }
};

int main()
{
}

But if I fully-qualify global_func by prefixing with "::", it doesn't compile with error "'global_func' was not declared in this scope":

struct A
{
    template <class T>
    void member_func(T t)
    {
        ::global_func(t);
    }
};

int main()
{
}

Also, if I try to pass global_func to boost::bind, it doesn't compile (same error):

#include <boost/bind.hpp>

class A
{
    template <class T>
    void member_func(T t)
    {
        boost::bind(global_func)(t);
    }
};

int main()
{
}

Why doesn't it compile in these cases? It seems like the member_func() template method isn't instantiated, so it shouldn't find the missing function error.

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don't you need code like this: void global_func(int a); void global_func(float b); etc? –  tp1 Nov 20 '11 at 20:20
3  
Your first and second example are identical, you might want to edit. –  themel Nov 20 '11 at 20:22
    
@tp1 - as far as I understand - no. The idea is, that a template is instantiated, when it's needed. And as no one instantiates this template function (for example - call to this member function or created object A), there should be no compile error. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 20 '11 at 20:23
    
interesting. I get why ::global_func would not be considered 'depending on template args', but the bind sample should be equivalent to the first –  sehe Nov 20 '11 at 20:34
    
@themel looks like someone fixed it for me, thanks! –  Kyle Simek Nov 20 '11 at 20:38
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In the first example global_func is a dependent name because it is an unqualified name used in a postfix () expression where the expression in parentheses depends on a template parameter. This means that lookup must be deferred until the point that the template is instantiated where the template parameter is known and ADL may have an effect.

In the second example ::global_func is a qualified name so its lookup is not deferred and it must be looked up at the pointer where the template is defined.

Similarly, in the expression boost::bind(global_func), global_func is not used in an expression which depends on the template parameter so, again, lookup is not deferred and a declaration must be visible at the point of definition of the member template.

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Thanks for the great answer! Quick follow-up: is there a common trick to force deferred lookup? –  Kyle Simek Nov 20 '11 at 21:15
    
@redmoskito: There aren't any common ones that I know of for your situation, but then I don't know what type you are expecting global_func to have. You could use a "no-op" cast if you are able to restrict the type of global_func. E.g.static_cast<void(*)(T)>(global_func) or something similar but this may affect the behaviour of the template. –  Charles Bailey Nov 20 '11 at 21:21
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