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Suppose I have a table with parent-child relationships.

parent  child
1       4
1       5
2       6
3       7
4       8
6       9
7       10
8       11

Now I have a query that returns a list of people (eg. 1 and 2) and I want to find all their children, grandchildren etc. (in this case: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11).

I know I can use common table expressions to search recursively, but I wondered if I could create a SQL statement to find all descendents at once without having to iterate over the input set.

Edit: sorry for not being clear enough. I'm looking for something like:

SELECT {Hierarchical relation} from table where parent in (1,2)

which should result in a single output column with rows for 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11.

I'm no longer interested in the relationship in the output, just the complete set of family members for multiple families.

share|improve this question
    
Does the output need to show their relationship (child, grandchild, etc) or that they are simply descended? –  Ghost Nov 20 '11 at 21:18
    
Could you give us a sample of the expected output in table/row-column format just like how you illustrated the table with the parent-child relationships? –  Nonym Nov 20 '11 at 21:36
    
Nonym, I added the expected output to the question. –  user18044 Nov 20 '11 at 22:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here it is

---- PlainTable ----
parent  idElement (child)
Null    1
1       4
1       5
2       6
3       7
4       8
6       9
7       10
8       11

WITH tableR (parent, idElement)
AS
(
-- Anchor member definition
    SELECT e.parent, e.idElement
    FROM PlainTable AS e   
    WHERE parent in (1,2)
    UNION ALL
-- Recursive member definition
    SELECT e.parent, e.idElement
    FROM PlainTable AS e
    INNER JOIN tableR AS d
        ON e.parent = d.idElement
)
-- Statement that executes the CTE
SELECT idElement
FROM tableR  --inner join to plain table by id if needed
share|improve this answer
    
This CTE does search the hierarchical relationship like I intended, but only for a single input. See my edit in the question. –  user18044 Nov 20 '11 at 22:50
    
First query of CTE looks for root nodes, I assume that root nodes have NULL as parent. Changhe this query for other criteria. –  danihp Nov 20 '11 at 23:07
    
Try your query in SQL management studio. It finds all descendents for parent IS NULL, which are (1, 4, 5, 8 and 11) and then returns only 1 from that result set. As I mentioned in the question above, the output should be a column with (1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11), which are all descendents for both parents 1 and 2. –  user18044 Nov 20 '11 at 23:13

using CTE

Recursive Queries Using Common Table Expressions

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186243.aspx

and

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/65540/

be can help you.

share|improve this answer

SQL Server 2008 has built in features to facilitate hierarchical data: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc794278.aspx

I know I can use common table expressions to search recursively, but I wondered if I could create a SQL statement to find all descendents at once without having to iterate over the input set.

I'm not sure what you mean by that. Most (maybe all?) CTE's can be accomplished through the use of subqueries, but using a subqueries wouldn't be any faster. When you say of you don't want to 'iterate' over the input set it sounds like you're talking about the use of cursors and of course you can do it as a set based operation (using CTEs or subqueries) but there's no way around the recursion.

Edit: I'm sorry, I'm not thinking straight... of course you can't do recursion with normal subqueries but the point still stands that even if you could it wouldn't be faster. If you'd like to see strategies for doing recursion without CTE's then try searches for something like 'recursion sql 2000' since CTE's weren't around back then. Here are some examples: http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/938/recursive-queries-with-sql-server-2000/. Of course, the answer to your question remains the same though.

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Typically I use a Nested Set Model for this and Yes you can have SQL do all the work for you, in fact you have SQL output XML that can be directly attached to .net treeview. Hope this helps

Link: Nested Set Model: Is there a simple way to query the children of a node?

share|improve this answer

Ok, danihp's solution did put me on the right track. This is the solution I came up with:

DECLARE @Input TABLE (
  id int
)

INSERT INTO @Input VALUES (1),(2)

;WITH Relations (parent, child)
AS
(
    SELECT e.parent, e.child
      FROM RelationTable AS e   
      WHERE parent in (SELECT * FROM @Input)
    UNION ALL
      SELECT e.parent, e.child
        FROM RelationTable AS e
        INNER JOIN Relations AS d
          ON e.parent = d.child
)
SELECT child
FROM Relations

It results in a list of child ids (excluding the 2 parent ids like I said earlier in the question): 4,5,6,8,9,11

share|improve this answer
    
oh! Sorry! My mistake, "WHERE idElement in (1,2)" may appear in first query not in last one! I will fix it. –  danihp Nov 21 '11 at 8:25

While waiting for an updated post:

SELECT DISTINCT 
  p.parent AS parent
, c.child AS child
, IFNULL(g.child, 'NONE') AS grandchild_of_parent
FROM parent_child as p
LEFT JOIN parent_child AS c ON p.parent = c.parent
LEFT JOIN parent_child AS g ON c.child = g.parent;

Results would look like this:

parent  child   grandchild_of_parent
1       4       8
1       5       NONE
2       6       9
3       7       10
4       8       11
6       9       NONE
7       10      NONE
8       11      NONE

Such a simple-minded-but-probably-harder-to-maintain type of code, but since I'm not familiar with SQL Server 2008's built in features to handle this type of request, I'll just throw a long shot...

EDIT:

Just so you can see results for yourself while you study common table expressions and/or perhaps pivots ... this will get your results, but only up to the great grandchildren of 1 and 2.

-- A. Parents 1 and 2
SELECT DISTINCT p.parent FROM parent_child AS p
WHERE p.parent IN (1,2)
UNION
-- B : Children of A
SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
WHERE p.parent IN (1,2)
UNION
-- C : Children of B, Grandchildren of A
SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
WHERE p.parent IN (
  SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
  WHERE p.parent IN (1,2)
)
UNION
-- D : Children of C, Great-Grandchildren of A
SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
WHERE p.parent IN (
  SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
  WHERE p.parent IN (
    SELECT DISTINCT p.child FROM parent_child AS p
    WHERE p.parent IN (1,2)
  )
)

Again, I strongly suggest you study what the others have been posting.. and look into the links they provided. The inelegant query I provided you is not going to last long->it will absolutely FAIL once you have great-great-grandchildren.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking for a single column with all the related ids. –  user18044 Nov 20 '11 at 22:51
    
BTW, IFNULL should be ISNULL in the query above for SQL Server. –  user18044 Nov 20 '11 at 23:00

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