Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using antlr to generate my parser, but I want to override some of the error reporting. At the moment if I give some incorrect syntax, for example a missing token, antlr gives the error "line 1:11 missing TYPE at '.'"

However I can't find in which method this error is outputted. It is not, as I originally thought, in the reportError() method. Does anyone know where the message is generated?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A MissingTokenException does pass through reportError(...). Let's say you would like to parse assignments using the grammar below:

grammar T;

parse      : assignment EOF;
assignment : Id '=' Number ';';
Number     : '0'..'9'+ ('.' '0'..'9'+)?;
Id         : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
Space      : ' ' {skip();};

Now simply override the reportError(...) method like this:

grammar T;

@parser::members {
  @Override
  public void reportError(RecognitionException e) {
    System.out.println("CUSTOM ERROR...\n" + e);
  }
}

parse      : assignment EOF;
assignment : Id '=' Number ';';
Number     : '0'..'9'+ ('.' '0'..'9'+)?;
Id         : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
Space      : ' ' {skip();};

and then try to parse, say, "= 123;" (a missing Id):

java -cp antlr-3.3.jar org.antlr.Tool T.g
javac -cp antlr-3.3.jar *.java
java -cp .:antlr-3.3.jar Main "= 123;"

CUSTOM ERROR...
MissingTokenException(inserted [@-1,0:0='<missing Id>',<4>,1:0] at =)

As you can see, the custom error message is being printed to the console.

EDIT

And a warning like "no viable alternative ..." is a problem in the lexer, not the parser. This happens when the lexer encounters a character that you did not account for in your grammar (or not as a proper token, at least).

Let's say you parse the input a = 123: (note the : at the end instead of a ;). The lexer will now produce a "no viable alternative ..." warning because I didn't define any token for that :.

An easy solution to account for such mistakes is to add a "catch-all" rule at the end of your lexer grammar that will match any character that is not matched by any lexer rule before it. Whenever such a "catch-all" rule matches, you simply throw an exception (or do something else, of course!) in the @after{...} block of that rule.

Here's a demo:

grammar T;

@parser::members {
  @Override
  public void reportError(RecognitionException e) {
    System.out.println("CUSTOM ERROR...\n" + e);
  }
}

parse      : assignment EOF;
assignment : Id '=' Number ';';
Number     : '0'..'9'+ ('.' '0'..'9'+)?;
Id         : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
Space      : ' ' {skip();};

FallThrough
@after{
  throw new RuntimeException(String.format(
      "Encountered an illegal char on line \%d, column \%d: '\%s'", 
      getLine(), getCharPositionInLine(), getText()
    )
  );
}
  :  . // match any char not matched by Number, Id or Space
  ;

If you now parse a = 123:, you will see the following on your console:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.RuntimeException: 
    Encountered an illegal char on line 1, column 8: ':'
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Overriding this method did work for some errors but it is still outputting Antlr errors for some. For example 'line 1:39 no viable alternative at character '$'. Can we override this one? –  user973758 Nov 21 '11 at 11:02
    
@user973758, you're welcome, and see my EDIT. –  Bart Kiers Nov 21 '11 at 11:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.