Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to figure out why the following codes doesn't return the same result:

CODE 1

p0 = "hello"
a = []
b = p0
1.upto(5) do |i|
  b.insert(2,"B")
  a.push b
end

a => ["heBBBBBllo", "heBBBBBllo", "heBBBBBllo", "heBBBBBllo", "heBBBBBllo"]

CODE 2

p0 = "hello"
a = []
b = p0
1.upto(5) do |i|
  b.insert(2,"B")
  a.push b.inspect
end

a => ["\"heBllo\"", "\"heBBllo\"", "\"heBBBllo\"", "\"heBBBBllo\"", "\"heBBBBBllo\""]

What I need is the Code 2's result, but I don't need the escaped char like the inspect method does.

Honestly, I really don't understand why with the inspect method works, and why in the code 1 doesn't. It seems like that in code 1, "b" is used as a pointer, and every time it's updated, all the "linked"-b are updated.

Any clue??

thank you in advance.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like that in code 1, "b" is used as a pointer, and every time it's updated, all the "linked"-b are updated.

Correct! In the first case, you're pushing b into the array five times, so the result is that a contains five pointers to b. In the second case you're pushing b.inspect - which is a different object from b.

The easiest way to fix your first example would be to call a.push b.dup instead, which creates a duplicate of b which won't be affected by future changes to b.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all guys, VERY usefull , finally I've understand the missing part of the puzzle ;). Just to be curious: using b.to_s will work as the same of code 1. Why? Should .to_s method return a new string like .inspect? thank you again!!! –  r0b0t Nov 21 '11 at 8:55

In code 1 you're pushing references to the same object. The array will contain multiple references to the same thing.

In code 2 you're pushing the inspect output at a distinct moment in time. The array will contain a history of inspect's returned strings.

share|improve this answer
p0 = "hello"
a = []
b = p0

1.upto(5) do |i|
  b.insert(2,"B")
  a.push b.clone
end
share|improve this answer
1  
+1; I forgot to actually provide anything beyond an explanation :/ –  Dave Newton Nov 20 '11 at 23:47

'b' is a string, which is an object. When you insert a letter, it modifies the object.

In CODE 1, that same object b is being pushed into the array multiple times, and modified multiple times.

However, b.inspect returns a new string. So in CODE 2, you push a new string into the array each iteration, and that new string is a snapshot of how 'b' looked at the time.

You could use a.push b.dup instead, which creates a copy of b without changing the format.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.