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I did some searching found some different methods and posts about creating a deep copy operator.

Is there a quick and easy (built-in) way to deep copy objects in Ruby? The fields are not arrays or hashes.

Working in Ruby 1.9.2.

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up vote 31 down vote accepted

Deep copy isn't built into vanilla Ruby, but you can hack it by marshalling and unmarshalling the object:

Marshal.load(Marshal.dump(@object))

This isn't perfect though, and won't work for all objects. A more robust method:

class Object
  def deep_clone
    return @deep_cloning_obj if @deep_cloning
    @deep_cloning_obj = clone
    @deep_cloning_obj.instance_variables.each do |var|
      val = @deep_cloning_obj.instance_variable_get(var)
      begin
        @deep_cloning = true
        val = val.deep_clone
      rescue TypeError
        next
      ensure
        @deep_cloning = false
      end
      @deep_cloning_obj.instance_variable_set(var, val)
    end
    deep_cloning_obj = @deep_cloning_obj
    @deep_cloning_obj = nil
    deep_cloning_obj
  end
end

Source:

http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/scat.rb/ruby/ruby-list/43424

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OK, thanks. I found a post about marshalling but didn't know if it was a reasonable solution. Marshal.load(Marshal.dump(@object)) worked great. – B Seven Nov 21 '11 at 2:13
    
It can also be a little slow – Alex Peattie Nov 21 '11 at 2:15
    
It was instantaneous for me. But just a simple object with a few fields... – B Seven Nov 21 '11 at 2:16
1  
Yeah, it's only slow relatively speaking - you'd only notice if you were cloning lots of objects at a time – Alex Peattie Nov 21 '11 at 2:17
3  
Obviously, it also assumes that the object is marshallable in the first place, which not all objects are. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '11 at 12:48

I've created a native implementation to perform deep clones of ruby objects.

It's approximately 6 to 7 times faster than the Marshal approach.

https://github.com/balmma/ruby-deepclone

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There is a native implementation to perform deep clones of ruby objects: ruby_deep_clone

Install it with gem:

gem install ruby_deep_clone

Example usage:

require "deep_clone"
object = SomeComplexClass.new()
cloned_object = DeepClone.clone(object)

It's approximately 6 to 7 times faster than the Marshal approach and event works with frozen objects.

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1  
Unfortunately, this gem does not handle custom Collection classes that inherit from Array and contain their own complex nested classes. Ruby_deep_clone turns those objects into Arrays and they lose their custom attributes. – Abe Heward Mar 14 '14 at 16:40

Also check out deep_dive. This allows you to do controlled deep copies of your object graphs.

https://rubygems.org/gems/deep_dive

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I would suggest you use the ActiveSupport gem which adds a lot of sugar to your native Ruby core, not just a deep clone method.

You can look into the documentation for more information regarding the methods that have been added.

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Rails has a recursive method named deep_dup that will return a deep copy of an object and, on the contrary of dup and clone, works even on composite objects (array/hash of arrays/hashes). It's as easy as:

def deep_dup
  map { |it| it.deep_dup }
end
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You can use duplicate gem for this.

It's a small pure ruby gem that able to recursively duplicate object It will duplicate it's object references too to the new duplication.

require 'duplicate'
duplicate('target object')

https://rubygems.org/gems/duplicate

https://github.com/adamluzsi/duplicate.rb

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