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In C++, how do I split a string into evenly-sized smaller string?

For example, I have a string "012345678" and want it to split it into 5 smaller strings, and this should return me something like "01", "23", "45", "67", "8".

I'm having trouble of determining the length of the smaller strings. In the previous example, the original string is size 9, and I want to split it into 5 smaller string, so each smaller string except the last one should be length 9 / 5 = 1, but then the last one will be length 9 - 1* 4 = 5, which is unacceptable.

So the formal definition of this problem: the original string is split into EXACTLY n substrings, and no two of the substrings should differ by greater than 1 in length.

My focus is not on C++ syntax or library. It's how to design an algorithm so that the returned string can be nearly-equal in size.

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2  
What have you tried? Where are you running into issues? –  Adam Wenger Nov 21 '11 at 5:39
1  
could you provide an example as to the string and what you expect the smaller string(s) to look like? –  Michael Dautermann Nov 21 '11 at 5:39
1  
Are you referring to std::string or a general char* (c-string)? –  Zeenobit Nov 21 '11 at 5:40
    
    
@muntoo not the same question. –  Shuo Nov 21 '11 at 6:40
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To divide N items into M parts, with lengths within one unit, you can use formula (N*i+N)/M - (N*i)/M as length of i'th part, as illustrated below.

 #include <string>
 #include <iostream>
 using namespace std;

 int main() {
   string text = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
   int N = text.length();
   for (int M=3; M<14; ++M) {
     cout <<" length:"<< N <<"  parts:"<< M << "\n";
     int at, pre=0, i;
     for (pre = i = 0; i < M; ++i) {
       at = (N+N*i)/M;
       cout << "part " << i << "\t" << pre << "\t" << at;
       cout << "\t" << text.substr(pre, at-pre) << "\n";
       pre = at;
     }
   }
   return 0;
 } 

For example, when M is 4 or 5, the code above produces:

  length:26  parts:4
 part 0 0   6   abcdef
 part 1 6   13  ghijklm
 part 2 13  19  nopqrs
 part 3 19  26  tuvwxyz
  length:26  parts:5
 part 0 0   5   abcde
 part 1 5   10  fghij
 part 2 10  15  klmno
 part 3 15  20  pqrst
 part 4 20  26  uvwxyz
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Great algorithm! –  Igor Oks Nov 21 '11 at 9:00
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My solution:

std::vector<std::string> split(std::string const & s, size_t count)
{
       size_t minsize = s.size()/count;
       int extra = s.size() - minsize * count;
       std::vector<std::string> tokens;
       for(size_t i = 0, offset=0 ; i < count ; ++i, --extra)
       {
          size_t size = minsize + (extra>0?1:0);
          if ( (offset + size) < s.size())
               tokens.push_back(s.substr(offset,size));
          else
               tokens.push_back(s.substr(offset, s.size() - offset));
          offset += size;
       }       
       return tokens;
}

Test code:

int main() 
{
      std::string s;
      while (std::cin >> s)
      {
        std::vector<std::string> tokens = split(s, 5);
        //output
        std::copy(tokens.begin(), tokens.end(), 
              std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, ", "));
        std::cout << std::endl;
      }
}

Input:

012345
0123456
01234567
012345678
0123456789
01234567890

Output:

01, 2, 3, 4, 5, 
01, 23, 4, 5, 6, 
01, 23, 45, 6, 7, 
01, 23, 45, 67, 8, 
01, 23, 45, 67, 89, 
012, 34, 56, 78, 90, 

Online Demo : http://ideone.com/gINtK

This solution tends to make the tokens even, i.e all tokens may not be of same size.

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I don't think this is correct. since size = 1, you end up with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6... –  Shuo Nov 21 '11 at 5:53
    
@Shuo: Yes. I was doubting that. Corrected it now. –  Nawaz Nov 21 '11 at 5:59
    
How about "012345" split into 5 sub-strings? –  Shuo Nov 21 '11 at 6:05
    
@Shuo: How do you want to split it? Your question is not clear enough. –  Nawaz Nov 21 '11 at 6:08
    
Yes, I guess I didn't make my question explicit, now I've got the formal definition. –  Shuo Nov 21 '11 at 6:24
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It's enough to know the length of substrings;
Assume m is size() of your string:

int k = (m%n == 0)? n : n-m%n;  

Then k of substrings should be of length m/n and n-k of length m/n+1.

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You get iterators for where you want to split it, then use those to construct new strings. For example:

std::string s1 = "string to split";
std::string::iterator halfway = s1.begin() + s1.size() / 2;
std::string s2(s1.begin(), halfway);
std::string s3(halfway, s1.end());
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Lets's say the string length is L and it must be split in n substrings.

# Find the next multiple of `n` greater than or equal to `L`

L = 9
n = 5

LL = n * (L / n)
if LL < L:
    LL += n

# Split a string of length LL into n equal sizes. The string is at
# most (n-1) longer than L.

lengths = [(LL / n) for x in range (n)]

# Remove one from the first (or any) (LL-L) elements.
for i in range (LL-L):
    lengths [i] = lengths [i] - 1

# Get indices from lengths. 
s = 0
idx = []
for i in lengths:
    idx.append (s)
    s = s + i
idx.append (L)

print idx

EDIT: OK, OK, I forgot it should be C++.

EDIT: Here it goes ...

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

unsigned int L = 13;
unsigned int n = 5;

int
main ()
{
  int i;
  unsigned int LL;
  std::vector<int> lengths, idx;

  /* Find the next multiple of `n` greater than or equal to `L` */
  LL = n * (L / n);
  if (LL < L)
    LL += n;

  /* Split a string of length LL into n equal sizes. The string is at
     most (n-1) longer than L. */
  for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    lengths.push_back (LL/n);

  /*  Remove one from the first (or any) (LL-L) elements. */
  for (i = 0; i < LL - L; ++i)
    --lengths [i];

  /* Get indices from lengths.  */
  int s = 0;
  for (auto &ii: lengths)
    {
      idx.push_back (s);
      s += ii;
    }

  idx.push_back (L);

  for (auto &i : idx)
    std::cout << i << " ";

  std::cout << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
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