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Let us assume,

int *p;
int a = 100;
p = &a;

What will the following code will do actually and how?

p++;
++p;
++*p;
++(*p);
++*(p);
*p++;
(*p)++;
*(p)++;
*++p;
*(++p);

I know, this is kind of messy in terms of coding, but I want to know what will actually happen when we code like this.

Note : Lets assume that the address of a=5120300, it is stored in pointer p whose address is 3560200. Now, what will be the value of p & a after the execution of each statement?

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why don't u just run it in the debugger? –  CyberSpock Nov 21 '11 at 6:27
9  
Well .. why not simply try it and see? printf will print a pointer with %p –  Brian Roach Nov 21 '11 at 6:29
    
If you're curious about behavior, just play around with it. Just write a simple c program that goes through all of these use cases and see if it makes sense to you. –  Cyrus Nov 21 '11 at 6:36
    
@AndersK. Maybe the OP expects undefined behavior? ...Or maybe not. –  Mateen Ulhaq Nov 21 '11 at 6:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

First, the * operator takes precedence over the ++ operator, and the () operators take precedence over everything else. EDIT(things are more complicated than that, see bottom edit)

Second, the ++number operator is the same as the number++ operator if you're not assigning them to anything. The difference is ++number returns number and then increments number, and number++ increments first and then returns it.

Third, by increasing the value of a pointer, you're incrementing it by the sizeof its contents, that is you're incrementing it as if you were iterating in an array.

So, to sum it all up:

ptr++; // Pointer moves to the next int position (as if it was an array)
++ptr; // Pointer moves to the next int position (as if it was an array)
++*ptr; // The value of ptr is incremented
++(*ptr); // The value of ptr is incremented
++*(ptr); // The value of ptr is incremented
*ptr++; // Pointer moves to the next int position (as if it was an array). But returns the old content
(*ptr)++; // The value of ptr is incremented
*(ptr)++; // Pointer moves to the next int position (as if it was an array). But returns the old content
*++ptr; // Pointer moves to the next int position, and then get's accessed, with your code, segfault
*(++ptr); // Pointer moves to the next int position, and then get's accessed, with your code, segfault

As there are a lot of cases in here, I might have made some mistake, please correct me if I'm wrong.

EDIT:

So I was wrong, the precedence is a little more complicated than what I wrote, view it here: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_precedence

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3  
*ptr++, the value is not incremented, the pointer is. These unary operators have the same precedence but they are evaluated right-to-left. The code means "take the contents from where ptr points at, then increment ptr". It is very common C code (and yes, quite confusing). Please correct this and I'll remove the downvote. Same for *(ptr)++, the parenthesis does nothing. –  Lundin Nov 21 '11 at 7:43
    
Thank you very much Lundin, did I miss anything else? –  felipemaia Nov 21 '11 at 15:03
    
@Lundin Hi, is the answer above corrected now? Thanks. –  Unheilig Mar 11 '14 at 22:51
2  
@Unheilig The first sentence is still completely wrong, postfix ++ takes precedence over unary * which has the same precedence as prefix ++. Apart from that, it seems ok. –  Lundin Mar 12 '14 at 7:19

With regards to "How to increment a pointer address and pointer's value?" I think that ++(*p++); is actually well defined and does what you're asking for, e.g.:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  int a = 100;
  int *p = &a;
  printf("%p\n",(void*)p);
  ++(*p++);
  printf("%p\n",(void*)p);
  printf("%d\n",a);
  return 0;
}

It's not modifying the same thing twice before a sequence point. I don't think it's good style though for most uses - it's a little too cryptic for my liking.

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checked the program and the results are as,

p++;  //use it then move to next int position
++p;  // move to next int and then use it
++*p; //increments the value by 1 then use it 
++(*p);  //increments the value by 1 then use it
++*(p);  //increments the value by 1 then use it
*p++;  //use the value of p then moves to next position
(*p)++;  //use the value of p then increment the value
*(p)++;  //use the value of p then moves to next position
*++p;  // moves to the next int location then use that value
*(++p);  //moves to next location then use that value
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