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I would like to populate an n * n (n being odd) matrix in the following way:

_   _   _   23  22  21  20
_   _   24  10  9   8   37
_   25  11  3   2   19  36
26  12  4   1   7   18  35
27  13  5   6   17  34  _
28  14  15  16  33  _   _
29  30  31  32  _   _   _

What is an easy way to do this using Mathematica?

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2  
Can we assume that n is odd? –  Szabolcs Nov 21 '11 at 9:31
    
@Szabolcs, I am sorry, you certainly can. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 21 '11 at 10:39
1  
Just curious: what are you going to use this for? –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 21 '11 at 16:22
    
@Sjoerd it relates to one of the Project Euler problems, but it is not the crux. I found the question of how to efficiently populate this construct an interesting question in itself. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 21 '11 at 16:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

With this helper function:

Clear[makeSteps];
makeSteps[0] = {};
makeSteps[m_Integer?Positive] :=
  Most@Flatten[
    Table[#, {m}] & /@ {{-1, 0}, {-1, 1}, {0, 1}, {1, 0}, {1, -1}, {0, -1}}, 1];

We can construct the matrix as

constructMatrix[n_Integer?OddQ] :=
  Module[{cycles, positions},
    cycles = (n+1)/2;
    positions = 
       Flatten[FoldList[Plus, cycles + {#, -#}, makeSteps[#]] & /@ 
           Range[0, cycles - 1], 1];
    SparseArray[Reverse[positions, {2}] -> Range[Length[positions]]]];

To get the matrix you described, use

constructMatrix[7] // MatrixForm

The idea behind this is to examine the pattern that the positions of consecutive numbers 1.. follow. You can see that these form the cycles. The zeroth cycle is trivial - contains a number 1 at position {0,0} (if we count positions from the center). The next cycle is formed by taking the first number (2) at position {1,-1} and adding to it one by one the following steps: {0, -1}, {-1, 0}, {-1, 1}, {0, 1}, {1, 0} (as we move around the center). The second cycle is similar, but we have to start with {2,-2}, repeat each of the previous steps twice, and add the sixth step (going up), repeated only once: {0, -1}. The third cycle is analogous: start with {3,-3}, repeat all the steps 3 times, except {0,-1} which is repeated only twice. The auxiliary function makeSteps automates the process. In the main function then, we have to collect all positions together, and then add to them {cycles, cycles} since they were counted from the center, which has a position {cycles,cycles}. Finally, we construct the SparseArray out of these positions.

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@Mr.Wizard I added some explanation –  Leonid Shifrin Nov 21 '11 at 11:19
    
Very nicely done. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 21 '11 at 11:22
    
@Mr.Wizard One can remove double Tranpose and use {cycles+#,cycles-#}& instead of {#,-#}&, to make the code shorter, at the expense of some performance penalty. –  Leonid Shifrin Nov 21 '11 at 11:24
    
How about cycles+{#,-#} ? :-) –  Mr.Wizard Nov 21 '11 at 11:27
    
@Mr.Wizard Yes, perfect. I will edit. –  Leonid Shifrin Nov 21 '11 at 11:27

I don't know the Mathematica syntax but I guess you could use an algorithm like this:

start in the middle of the matrix
enter a 1 into the middle
go up-right (y-1 / x+1)
set integer iter=1
set integer num=2
while cursor is in matrix repeat:
   enter num in current field 
   increase num by 1
   repeat iter times:
       go left (x-1 / y)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   repeat iter times:
       go down-left (x-1 / y+1)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   repeat iter times:
       go down (x / y+1)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   repeat iter times:
       go right (x+1 / y)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   repeat iter times:
       go up-right (x+1 / y-1)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   repeat iter-1 times:
       go up (x / y-1)
       enter num in current field 
       increase num by 1
   go up-up-right (y-2 / x+1)
   increase iter by 1

you can also pretty easily convert this algorithm into a functional version or into a tail-recursion.

Well, you will have to check in the while loop if you aren't out of bounds as well. If n is odd then you can just count num up while:

m = floor(n/2)
num <= n*n - (m+m*m)

I'm pretty sure that there's a simpler algorithm but that's the most intuitive one to me.

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1  
While something like this certainly works, and it's straightforward, I think the point of the question is how to leverage Mathematica's built-in functionality and functional programming contstructs to come up with something easier and more compact :-) –  Szabolcs Nov 21 '11 at 10:41
    
While I did my version independently, I just realized that this is the same algorithm I ended up with, just done procedurally. +1. –  Leonid Shifrin Nov 21 '11 at 12:18
    
@Leonid I must admit that I got lost in the middle of reading this and thought "I'll just wait for a Mathematica answer." PeterT: +1 –  Mr.Wizard Nov 21 '11 at 13:09

The magic numbers on the diagonal starting at 1 and going up right can be arrived at from

f[n_] := 2 Sum[2 m - 1, {m, 1, n}] + UnitStep[n - 3] Sum[2 m, {m, 1, n - 2}]

In  := f@Range@5
Out := {2, 8, 20, 38, 62}

With this it should be easy to set up a SparseArray. I'll play around with it a bit and see how hard that is.

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1  
You can reduce that to 2 - 3 n + 3 n^2 –  Szabolcs Nov 21 '11 at 11:00
    
Even simpler is the recursive definiton f[-1]=2;f[i_]:=6i+f[i-1]; –  Timo Nov 21 '11 at 11:46
    
As usual oeis.org/… :) –  belisarius Nov 21 '11 at 12:13
    
Going downwards by the big antidiagonal oeis.org/… –  belisarius Nov 21 '11 at 12:31
    
@belisarius Or FindSequenceFunction[{2, 8, 20, 38}], but that's not something easy to trust (are the following numbers going to match too?) –  Szabolcs Nov 21 '11 at 13:15

First version:

i = 10;
a = b = c = Array[0 &, {2 (2 i + 1), 2 (2 i + 1)}];
f[n_] := 3*n*(n + 1) + 1;
k = f[i - 2];
p[i_Integer] :=
  ToRules@Reduce[
    -x + y < i - 1 && -x + y > -i + 1 &&
     (2 i + 1 - x)^2 + (2 i + 1 - y)^2 <= 2 i i - 2 &&
     3 i - 1 > x > i + 1 &&
     3 i - 1 > y > i + 1, {x, y}, Integers];

((a[[Sequence @@ #]] = 1) & /@ ({x, y} /. {p[i]}));
((a[[Sequence @@ (# + {2, 2})]] = 0) & /@ ({x, y} /. {p[i - 1]}));

(b[[Sequence @@ #]] = k--)&/@((# + 2 i {1, 1}) &/@ (SortBy[(# - 2 i {1, 1}) &/@ 
       Position[a, 1], 
      N@(Mod[-10^-9 - Pi/4 + ArcTan[Sequence @@ #], 2  Pi]) &]));
c = Table[b[[2 (2 i + 1) - j, k]], {j, 2 (2 i + 1) - 1}, 
                                   {k, 2 (2 i + 1) - 1}];
MatrixPlot[c]

enter image description here

Edit

A better one:

genMat[m_] := Module[{f, k, k1, i, n, a = {{1}}},
  f[n_] := 3*n*(n + 1) + 1;
  For[n = 1, n <= m, n++,
   a = ArrayPad[a, 1];
   k1 = (f[n - 1] + (k = f[n]) + 2)/2 - 1;
   For[i = 2, i <= n + 1, i++,  a[[i, 2n + 1]] = k--; a[[2-i+2 n, 1]] = k1--];
   For[i = n + 2, i <= 2 n + 1, i++, a[[i, 3n+2-i]] = k--; a[[-i,i-n]] = k1--];
   For[i = n, i >= 1, i--, a[[2n+1, i]] = k--;a[[1, -i + 2 n + 2]] = k1--];
   ];
  Return@MatrixForm[a];
  ]

genMat[5]
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1  
That looks quite interesting; would you please explain it? –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 6:31
1  
@Mr. The current code incarnation is still too convoluted. I'll clean it up and comment as soon as I get some free time. There are two main ideas there (nothing brillant) : 1) describe the "hexagon" geometrically and let Reduce[] find the edges and 2) Sort the edge elements by the angle subtended from the polygon center. The third idea is not mine f[n_] := 3*n*(n + 1) + 1 comes from here oeis.org/… –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 6:40
    
I cannot imagine this being highly efficient, but +1 for a completely different approach. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 6:42
    
@Mr. I guess it will end up being quite efficient, as the geometric description is very simple once you draw it. Just look at my picture: 4 straight segments and two Pi/4 staircases. I'll remove the Reduce[] part. Then I will get rid of the SortBy[], because I'll build the edges in order, and I know the highest number is f[i-2]. So it will be three loops and O(n). –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 6:52
1  
@Mr. Then you can enjoy that now –  belisarius Nov 24 '11 at 3:09

A partial solution, using image procssing:

enter image description here

Image /@ (Differences@(ImageData /@ 
     NestList[
      Fold[ImageAdd, 
        p = #, (HitMissTransform[p, #, Padding -> 0] & /@
          {{{1}, {-1}},
           {{-1}, {-1}, {1}},
           {{1, -1, -1}},
           {{-1, -1, 1}},
           {{-1, -1, -1, -1}, {-1, -1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, -1, -1}}, 
           {{-1, -1, -1,  1}, {-1, -1, -1, -1}, {-1, -1, -1, -1}}})] &, img, 4]))

enter image description here

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Would this question be of interest to you? –  r.m. Nov 21 '11 at 20:18
    
@yoda Nice question and not easy at all. I think one should try to recognize rotated ellipses. –  belisarius Nov 22 '11 at 1:26
    
It would be nice if you gave it a shot :) I can even bounty it to boost you up :D There's a few image processing questions floating around (here's another interesting one), but not enough people knowledgable to answer it. A lot of folks are just posting half-assed answers... –  r.m. Nov 22 '11 at 1:29
    
@yoda Posted a partial answer –  belisarius Nov 22 '11 at 1:37
1  
Thanks, @bel. I will keep my word on the bounty :) –  r.m. Nov 22 '11 at 1:39

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