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I try to understand how to work simple init funcion and I don't know where I have made a mistake. Can somebody assist?

Rectangle.h

@interface Rectangle : NSObject
{
    int width;
    int height;
}
-(id)initObject;
@end

Rectangle.m

@implementation Rectangle

-(id)initObject{
    if (self = [super init]) {
        height = 5;
        width = 7;
    }
    return self;
}    

@end

And in ViewController.h i import Rectangle.h, declare *rect object and in .m i execute(? run?) initObject.

ViewController.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "Rectangle.h"
@interface ViewController : UIViewController
{
    Rectangle *rect;
}
@end

ViewController.m

-(void)viewDidLoad
{
    rect = [[Rectangle alloc] initObject];
    NSLog(@"%@", rect);

    [super viewDidLoad];

}

initObject return me:

 2011-11-21 09:43:02.625 initializers[43693:f803] <Rectangle: 0x6ab1660>
share|improve this question
    
why this "if (self = [super init]) {?" – doNotCheckMyBlog Nov 21 '11 at 8:56
1  
There is no problem, looks fine. If you want to see height and width write NSLog(@"%d, %d", rect.height, rect.width); – beryllium Nov 21 '11 at 8:57
    
i see in many samples it's just look like. i saw also: self = [super init]; if(self){... – Tomasz Szulc Nov 21 '11 at 8:59
    
@beryllium, doesn't work :/ – Tomasz Szulc Nov 21 '11 at 9:00
1  
@Brogrammer: The classic initializer style uses if ((self = [super init])) { ... }. This is the style that's been used for many years in Cocoa. Recently there's been a trend towards self = [super init]; if (self) { ... }, but this is functionally the same, although I personally think it's a waste of a line. – Kevin Ballard Nov 21 '11 at 9:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only problem with your code that I can see is you called your initializer -initObject for no good reason. It's not taking any parameters at all, so you really should just call it -init like every other parameterless initializer in the system.

As for the log output, I imagine your confusion lies in the fact that it says <Rectangle: 0x6ab1660>. This is perfectly normal. The default implementation of -description (the method that returns this output) is the name of the class of the object followed by the object's address. In other words, -[NSObject description] is likely to be implemented something like the following:

- (NSString *)description {
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"<%@: %p>",
                                      NSStringFromClass([self class]),
                                      self];
}

This means that instance variables of your object are not going to be printed. A number of built-in classes do print their instance variables when logged, but this was implemented specifically for that class and is not a generic mechanism. If you want to verify that your Rectangle object is correct, you could implement -description like so:

- (NSString *)description {
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"<%@: %p width=%d, height=%d>",
                                      NSStringFromClass([self class]),
                                      self,
                                      width,
                                      height];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Another answer that makes the rest of us redundant! I'll go back to work now... :) – jrturton Nov 21 '11 at 9:02
    
thank you for help, i understand this now ; ) so, when i use init function i should to use -description. – Tomasz Szulc Nov 21 '11 at 9:15
    
@TomaszSzulc Not necessarily, you only need to override description if you want your custom class to print differently by default when passed as an argument for stringWithFormat. As mentioned by others you can still test those variables outside of description. TLDR: You don't have to use description with your init functions. – Brandon Buck Nov 23 '11 at 20:56

No error! Since your Rectangle class has no description method, calling NSLog(@"%@", rect); will return the class of the object, followed by its address in memory.

If you want to print width and height of the rectangle you may use something like:

in Rectangle.h

@interface Rectangle : NSObject 
{
    int width;
    int height;
}
-(id)initObject;

@property int width, height;
@end

in Rectangle.m

@implementation Rectangle

@synthesize width, height;

-(id)initObject{
    if (self = [super init]) {
        height = 5;
        width = 7;
    }
    return self;
}    

@end

and then call

NSLog(@"width=%d, height=%d", [rect width], [rect height]);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for help, it's correct now ; ) – Tomasz Szulc Nov 21 '11 at 9:13

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