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I have the following:

namespace Test {

public class Location {
    public string city { get; set; }
}

public class BaseViewModel {
    public BaseViewModel() {
        Location = new Location { city = "Paris"; };
    }
    public Location Location { get; set; }
}

public class EditViewModel : BaseViewModel {
    public Book Book { get; set; }
    Location = "France";
}

}

This seem like a strange requirement but how can I set the value of Location from within the EditViewModel? The line below gives the following error:

Location = "France";
Error   2   Invalid token '=' in class, struct, or interface member declaration
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add a constructor.

public EditViewModel ()  {
  Location = "France";
}

or better add a specialized constructor and a default constructor:

    public EditViewModel (string LocationText)  {
      Location = LocationText;
    }

    public EditViewModel() : this("France") { }

just to be precise, don't use string, use your Object, I've used string for quickening.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it is better to not use a specialized constructor. Matter of opinion, but when you do that, you may find yourself constantly changing constructors every time you want to initialize another property. The only time I do that is when I have no default constructor and I need to force some fields to be initialized. –  Rob Kent Nov 21 '11 at 9:44
    
@RobKent I may agree if the hierarchy tree is deep, but with just two classes I guess he should have no problem at all. I prefer to use extensively the : base() or : this() thing (Is it called initialization list also in C# ?), but as you perfectly stated, it just depends on personal tastes and scenarios. –  BigMike Nov 21 '11 at 9:51

You need to istantiate the object Location, not to set it as a string:

Location = new Location { city = "France" }; 

and it's better if you rename the property with a different name, do not use the class name.

public class BaseViewModel { 
    public BaseViewModel() { 
        CurrentLocation = new Location { city = "Paris"; }; 
    } 
    public Location CurrentLocation { get; set; } 
}

public class EditViewModel : BaseViewModel { 
    public Book Book { get; set; } 
    public EditViewModel() : base()
    {
        CurrentLocation = new Location { city = "France"; }; 
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

you just need to change EditViewModel class..

Like this:

public class EditViewModel : BaseViewModel {
    public Book Book { get; set; }

    public EditViewModel(){
        Location = "France";
    }
}

*You were trying to set value to the base class property in class's scope.. which is not allowed..

You can do this in constructor on any other method within a class.. As I mentioned above..

Hope this help !

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