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I want to refactor an emun in two new enums, but I don't like to copy/paste the enum methods in all new enums.

enum EmailType {
    REMINDER_ADMIN('reminderForAdmin')
    REMINDER_PRODUCTION('reminderForProduction')
    REMINDER_MANAGEMENT('reminderForManagement')
    REMINDER_CUSTOMER('reminderForCustomer')

    private final propertiesIdentifier

    String getTemplate(type) {
        ...
    }

    String getFrom(type) {
        ...
    }

    String getTo(type) {
        ...
    }

    String getBcc(type) {
        ...
    }

    ...
}

It's possible to implements only one time the methods and use in several enums?

enum EmailTypeAdministration {
    REMINDER_ADMIN('reminderForAdmin')
    REMINDER_PRODUCTION('reminderForProduction')

    ...
}

enum EmailTypeClients {
    REMINDER_MANAGEMENT('reminderForManagement')
    REMINDER_CUSTOMER('reminderForCustomer')

    ...
}
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1  
It think it is not possible, but your enums could implement the same interface, so you can access the methods over the interface. –  Stephan Nov 21 '11 at 10:07

4 Answers 4

As my old friend Clippy would say, "it looks like you're using Groovy". If so, you can use a mixin to add the common methods to both enums.

// This class holds the methods that will be mixed-in to the enums
class EnumUtils {
    String getTemplate(type) {
      "template" + type       
    }

    String getFrom(type) {        
    }

    String getTo(type) {        
    }

    String getBcc(type) {        
    }
}

// This annotation adds the common methods to the enum
@Mixin(EnumUtils)
enum EmailTypeAdministration {
    REMINDER_ADMIN('reminderForAdmin'),
    REMINDER_PRODUCTION('reminderForProduction')

   EmailTypeAdministration(str) {} 
}

// This annotation adds the common methods to the enum
@Mixin(EnumUtils) 
enum EmailTypeClients {
    REMINDER_MANAGEMENT('reminderForManagement'),
    REMINDER_CUSTOMER('reminderForCustomer')

   EmailTypeClients(str) {}
}

// Quick test to prove the methods exist and return the expected values 
EmailTypeAdministration emailTypeAdmin = EmailTypeAdministration.REMINDER_ADMIN
assert 'templateParam' == emailTypeAdmin.getTemplate('Param')

You can run the code above in the Groovy console to prove it works as advertised

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I can't get that to run... What version is it working under? –  tim_yates Nov 21 '11 at 10:37
    
@tim_yates works for me in groovy console 1.8.2 –  Dónal Nov 21 '11 at 10:51
    
Interesting, I think can also use @Delegate –  Arturo Herrero Nov 21 '11 at 11:00
    
@Don Odd.. doesn't work for me with 1.8.0-1.8.4, 1.7.10 or 1.7.6 (the only ones I tried)... I only asked, as I was going for a similar solution, but couldn't get it to work... You Java 6? –  tim_yates Nov 21 '11 at 11:23
    
@tim_yates yes, Java 6 –  Dónal Nov 21 '11 at 11:28

Enums cannot extend any other class since all enums automatically extend class named Enum. So, your only option is to delegate the methods implementation to separate utility. This may be relevant if the implementation is not trivial (more than one line). Otherwise delegation does not give you serious benefits.

Other possibility is to extend Enum manually but I be ready to write verbose code like valueOf(), values() etc., so I am not sure you really need this.

EDIT:

Take a look on my article about Hierarchical Enums. It can probably help you too.

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Thanks, I'm using Groovy and can implement in one line with Delegate transformation –  Arturo Herrero Nov 24 '11 at 11:48

The Enum type can't do that but you can use Groovy Mixins or a factory with an interface:

  1. In the enums, just define the constants. All enums must implement a common marker interface.
  2. Create a factory which accepts the marker interface and contains the getters.

The factory approach allows you to move the configuration (like templates, email addresses) into a config file which the factory reads at startup.

Lesson: Don't put configuration into enums. Enums are constants. Configuration changes.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally the Mixin solution don't works because @Mixin annotation only works with classes instead of enums.

I use a similar approach with delegate. Delegate transformation works fine! This code can be improve to use EnumUtils with factory or singleton pattern.

class EnumUtils {
    String getTemplate(type) {
      "template" + type       
    }

    String getFrom(type) {        
    }

    String getTo(type) {        
    }

    String getBcc(type) {        
    }
}

enum EmailTypeAdministration {
    REMINDER_ADMIN('reminderForAdmin'),
    REMINDER_PRODUCTION('reminderForProduction')

    @Delegate EnumUtils enumUtils = new EnumUtils()
    EmailTypeAdministration(str) {} 
}

enum EmailTypeClients {
    REMINDER_MANAGEMENT('reminderForManagement'),
    REMINDER_CUSTOMER('reminderForCustomer')

    @Delegate EnumUtils enumUtils = new EnumUtils()
    EmailTypeClients(str) {}
}

EmailTypeAdministration emailTypeAdmin = EmailTypeAdministration.REMINDER_ADMIN
assert 'templateParam' == emailTypeAdmin.getTemplate('Param')
share|improve this answer
    
The mixin solution does work –  Josua Theron Jun 2 at 16:45

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