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I have used a for loop in my script like this ...

 for var in ipsec_packet*.txt; do
 echo $var
 done

Output

ipsec_packet10.txt
ipsec_packet11.txt
ipsec_packet12.txt
ipsec_packet13.txt
ipsec_packet14.txt
ipsec_packet15.txt
ipsec_packet16.txt
ipsec_packet17.txt
ipsec_packet18.txt
ipsec_packet1.txt
ipsec_packet2.txt
ipsec_packet3.txt
ipsec_packet4.txt
ipsec_packet5.txt
ipsec_packet6.txt
ipsec_packet7.txt
ipsec_packet8.txt
ipsec_packet9.txt

but I want them starting from 1 to the largest avaliable (here 18) in sorted order like this ..

ipsec_packet1.txt
ipsec_packet2.txt
... 
...
ipsec_packet18.txt

I tried sort -n k14 but it did not help. Please suggest me some variation of sort or any other bash/awk feature which could help me.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe awk is wrong tool for sorting data. – ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Nov 21 '11 at 11:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can try using sort with the -V option used for natural sorting of numbers within text:

for var in `ls ipsec_packet*.txt | sort -V`; do  echo $var; done
share|improve this answer
    
my sort (GNU coreutils) 6.10 doesn't have -V – Kent Nov 21 '11 at 12:07

If GNU sort is not available (i.e. -V isn't supported) and if Perl is acceptable:

perl -le'
  print join $/, 
    map $_->[1], 
      sort { 
        $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] 
        } map [/(\d+)\./, $_], 
          glob shift
  ' '*.txt'

Alternatively:

printf '%s\n' *.txt |
  sed 's/.*[^0-9]\([0-9]*\)\./\1,&/' |
    sort -n |
      cut -d, -f2-
share|improve this answer

I would prefer codaddict's solution, but here is a sed+sort trick for when your sort doesn't have -V:

for var in $(ls ipsec_packet*.txt | sed 's/[0-9]/\t&/' | sort -n -k2 | sed 's/\t//')
do
    echo $var
done

You can replace \t with any single character that does not appear in your input data and specify that character as sort's field separator with -t.

share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

ls -v ipsec_packet*.txt
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