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I have code like this:

public class test {
    public string aa { get; set; }
    public string bb { get; set; }
    public string cc { get; set; }
}

var a = new test {
    aa = "a",
    bb = "b"
}

var d = a;
d.cc = "c";

Is there any way for me to create class d and at the same time populate it. So for example the last two lines could be combined into one? Note that I want to avoid doing this with a constructor as sometime it will be different fields other than cc which I will populate.

please note my edit

var d = a;
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6  
What's wrong with doing it how you initialise a? If you really want it on one line, not just in one statement you could just put that on one line. –  George Duckett Nov 21 '11 at 11:33
2  
side note. you not creating class d, you creating instance of class test –  Reniuz Nov 21 '11 at 11:44
    
As @Reniuz noted, also, it's setting it to the same instance that a refers to. i.e. change a property of d and you change a. –  George Duckett Nov 21 '11 at 11:50
    
Also after this: var d = a; d.cc = "c"; it actually changes a.cc property to "c" –  Reniuz Nov 21 '11 at 11:50
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Given your new description of the problem, how about this:

Note that it changes a as well (same as your code), it doesn't create a copy. If you want a copy, go with Oded's solution.

public class test
{
    public string aa { get; set; }
    public string bb { get; set; }
    public string cc { get; set; }

    public test AlterTest(Action<test> alteration)
    {
        alteration(this);
        return this;
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var a = new test
    {
        aa = "a",
        bb = "b"
    };

    var d = a.AlterTest((t) => t.cc = "c");
}

I'd say this isn't as readable as your original code though (as you need to know what AlterTest does, which isn't a lot).

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This is a very interesting solution. I will look into this now. Thanks –  Samantha J Nov 21 '11 at 11:55
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This line is not complile:

var d = test;

Initializers only works when crating object so in your case, only at this point:

var d = new test {
    cc = "c"
}

Msdn Doc about initializers: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384062.aspx

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Sorry I made a mistake then lost the internet connection so I could not immediately correct it. I changed the code now. –  Samantha J Nov 21 '11 at 11:41
1  
Anyway, it is not possible to use initializers on already initialized object. As far as i know there is no short syntax for this. –  Kamil Lach Nov 21 '11 at 11:44
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You can do it the same way you have for a:

var d = new test {
    cc = "c"
}

This syntax is not using the constructor to pass in parameters, but is known as an object initializer.

Whenever you create a new object from a class, a constructor gets called. There is no way to avoid this.


Update:

Now that it is clearer what you want to do, one way forward is to use a copy constructor and use that as a basis for new objects:

public class test {

    public test(test o)
    {
      aa = o.aa;
      bb = o.bb;
    }

    public string aa { get; set; }
    public string bb { get; set; }
    public string cc { get; set; }
}

var a = new test {
    aa = "a",
    bb = "b"
}

var d = new test(a) {cc = "c"};
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2  
It does use the constructor. That code will call the parameterless constructor, then set the properties. –  Jon Skeet Nov 21 '11 at 11:40
    
Sorry I made a mistake then lost the internet connection so I could not immediately correct it. I changed the code now. –  Samantha J Nov 21 '11 at 11:41
    
@Jon - of course you are right. I should have been clearer. –  Oded Nov 21 '11 at 11:44
    
But what I need is to make d into a copy of a and then add some additional information. –  Samantha J Nov 21 '11 at 11:49
    
@RichardM - I see. Answer updated. –  Oded Nov 21 '11 at 11:52
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You could create a constructor for the class and pass in the desired values

//Class constructor
public Test(string aa, string bb, string cc) 
{
    this.aa = aa;
    ...
}




var test = new Test("a","b","c")
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I can't use constructors. Sometimes I want to update the field cc other times it might be one of many different fields. –  Samantha J Nov 21 '11 at 11:42
    
without overloading the constructor for you various variables I am not sure what to suggest. –  Andy Stannard Nov 21 '11 at 12:02
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