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I know I can do that:

const
  arrayOfIntegers : Array[1..15] of Integer = (3,2,8,10,1,6,2,13,13,3,13,13,13,3,45);

But how can I do the following instead?

var
  arrayOfIntegers : Array[1..15] of Integer;
begin
  arrayOfIntegers := (3,2,8,10,1,6,2,13,13,3,13,13,13,3,45);
end;

As soon as I try to compile the code above I get E2029 ')' expected but ',' found

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If you used a dynamic array you could use the dyn array constructor. Here you can declare a const and then assign it to your variable. –  David Heffernan Nov 21 '11 at 12:10
2  
In addition to David's "const-and-assign" approach, you have to declare a new type and use it for the array const and var to make this work. Declaring both as Array[1..15] of Integer will lead to an "incompatible type" error. –  Uwe Raabe Nov 21 '11 at 12:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A typical use will be the following:

type
  TIntegerArray1to15 = Array[1..15] of Integer;
const
  INIT_INT_1_15_ARRAY: TIntegerArray1to15 = (3,2,8,10,1,6,2,13,13,3,13,13,13,3,45);

var
  arrayOfIntegers : TIntegerArray1to15;
begin
  arrayOfIntegers := INIT_INT_1_15_ARRAY;
  .... use and update arrayOfIntegers[]
end;

You should better define your own type in this case (code won't be slower or bigger, and you'll be able to make assignments between instances of this type). And you'll ensure that your array boundaries will be as expected (1..15).

The const statement will be compiled as a "reference" array, which will be copied in your arrayOfIntegers local variable. I've made it uppercase, which a somewhat commmon usage when declaring constants (but not mandatory - this is just a personal taste).

If you want your code to be more generic and reusable (which IMHO makes sense if you want to be a lazy programmer) you may rely on dynamic arrays, and/or array of const parameters (if your array start with index 0).

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You didn't mention what Delphi version you're using but in the modern Delphi you can do something like this:

var
  arrayOfIntegers : TArray<Integer>;
begin
  arrayOfIntegers := TArray<Integer>.Create(3,2,8,10,1,6,2,13,13,3,13,13,13,3,45);
end;
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1  
Note that this will be a 0-based array instead of the originally 1-based. –  Uwe Raabe Nov 21 '11 at 12:19
    
Yes, it will be. That's why it is always better to use Low() and High() when looping arrays to avoid this issue. –  Linas Nov 21 '11 at 12:28
    
@Linas Can you use for i := low(arrayOfIntegers) to high(arrayOfIntegers) do - I'm not sure it will even compile. I guess you should better, on modern version of Delphi use for aInteger in arrayOfIntegers do –  Arnaud Bouchez Nov 21 '11 at 13:10
    
@Linas Should not the arrayOfInteger be freed after use? If yes, you may consider change your code not to be misleading someone. –  Arnaud Bouchez Nov 21 '11 at 13:11
1  
@DavidHeffernan @Linas Thanks for the input. I did not use this syntax usually (since I want my code to be compiled in most Delphi versions, including FPC). That's why my comments were in form of questions, not assertions. What was worrying me is the fact that dynamic arrays or TArray<Integer> are 0-based, and not the same as Array[1..15] of Integer. Plain static arrays still exists and have their meaning! In all cases, I'm happy having learn something, thanks to you all. –  Arnaud Bouchez Nov 21 '11 at 16:19

The syntax used in the const section is only valid for typed array constants. You cannot use it as a literal array constant in an assignment.

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