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I need a code snippet for converting amount of time given by number of seconds into some human readable form. The function should receive a number and output a string like this:

34 seconds 
12 minutes 
4 hours 
5 days 
4 months
1 year

No formatting required, hard-coded format will go.

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1  
possible duplicate of How to convert milliseconds into human readable form? –  nfechner Nov 21 '11 at 12:26
    
yes and no, I was thinking there is a good JavaScript solution for this... –  Dan Nov 21 '11 at 12:35
    
Seconds is a human readable form. –  nnnnnn Nov 21 '11 at 12:43
1  
Well, "213123 seconds" is not so readable. You can propose a better title –  Dan Nov 21 '11 at 12:47

13 Answers 13

 function secondsToString(seconds)
{
var numyears = Math.floor(seconds / 31536000);
var numdays = Math.floor((seconds % 31536000) / 86400); 
var numhours = Math.floor(((seconds % 31536000) % 86400) / 3600);
var numminutes = Math.floor((((seconds % 31536000) % 86400) % 3600) / 60);
var numseconds = (((seconds % 31536000) % 86400) % 3600) % 60;
return numyears + " years " +  numdays + " days " + numhours + " hours " + numminutes + " minutes " + numseconds + " seconds";

}
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Thanks! If you add checking for plural(year/years) it would be perfect! –  Dan Nov 21 '11 at 12:34
    
@Dan try now....... –  Royi Namir Nov 21 '11 at 12:57
    
Thanks for your help, Royi. See my answer below which answers my question completely –  Dan Nov 21 '11 at 13:51
1  
and the magic numbers: secondsInAYear = 31536000; secondsInADay = 86400; secondsInAnHour = 3600; secondsInAMinute = 60; –  jberger Sep 10 '13 at 7:03
    
Note: This doesn't take into account leap years, and only provides the values as a "span of time". –  James Wilkins Nov 15 '13 at 2:48

Try following:

seconds = ~~(milliseconds / 1000);
minutes = ~~(seconds / 60);
hours = ~~(minutes / 60);
days = ~~(hours / 24);
weeks = ~~(days / 7);
year = ~~(days / 365);

Note:

  • A usual year has 365 days. A leap year has 366 days, so you need additional check if this is an issue for you.
  • The similar problem with daylight saving. Some days have 23 and some 25 hours when time's changed.

Conclusion: this is a rude but small and simple snippet :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for reminding me about leap year –  Dan Nov 21 '11 at 12:41
    
Rewritten your code a bit according to bemchmark tests showing parseInt is too slow –  Dan Apr 16 '13 at 8:44
up vote 21 down vote accepted

With help of Royi we've got code that outputs time interval in a human readable form:

function millisecondsToStr (milliseconds) {
    // TIP: to find current time in milliseconds, use:
    // var  current_time_milliseconds = new Date().getTime();

    function numberEnding (number) {
        return (number > 1) ? 's' : '';
    }

    var temp = Math.floor(milliseconds / 1000);
    var years = Math.floor(temp / 31536000);
    if (years) {
        return years + ' year' + numberEnding(years);
    }
    //TODO: Months! Maybe weeks? 
    var days = Math.floor((temp %= 31536000) / 86400);
    if (days) {
        return days + ' day' + numberEnding(days);
    }
    var hours = Math.floor((temp %= 86400) / 3600);
    if (hours) {
        return hours + ' hour' + numberEnding(hours);
    }
    var minutes = Math.floor((temp %= 3600) / 60);
    if (minutes) {
        return minutes + ' minute' + numberEnding(minutes);
    }
    var seconds = temp % 60;
    if (seconds) {
        return seconds + ' second' + numberEnding(seconds);
    }
    return 'less than a second'; //'just now' //or other string you like;
}
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function millisecondsToString(milliseconds) {
    var oneHour = 3600000;
    var oneMinute = 60000;
    var oneSecond = 1000;
    var seconds = 0;
    var minutes = 0;
    var hours = 0;
    var result;

    if (milliseconds >= oneHour) {
        hours = Math.floor(milliseconds / oneHour);
    }

    milliseconds = hours > 0 ? (milliseconds - hours * oneHour) : milliseconds;

    if (milliseconds >= oneMinute) {
        minutes = Math.floor(milliseconds / oneMinute);
    }

    milliseconds = minutes > 0 ? (milliseconds - minutes * oneMinute) : milliseconds;

    if (milliseconds >= oneSecond) {
        seconds = Math.floor(milliseconds / oneSecond);
    }

    milliseconds = seconds > 0 ? (milliseconds - seconds * oneSecond) : milliseconds;

    if (hours > 0) {
        result = (hours > 9 ? hours : "0" + hours) + ":";
    } else {
        result = "00:";
    }

    if (minutes > 0) {
        result += (minutes > 9 ? minutes : "0" + minutes) + ":";
    } else {
        result += "00:";
    }

    if (seconds > 0) {
        result += (seconds > 9 ? seconds : "0" + seconds) + ":";
    } else {
        result += "00:";
    }

    if (milliseconds > 0) {
        result += (milliseconds > 9 ? milliseconds : "0" + milliseconds);
    } else {
        result += "00";
    }

    return result;
}
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This function outputs seconds in this format : 11h 22m, 1y 244d, 42m 4s etc Set the max variable to show as many identifiers as you want.

function secondsToString (seconds) {

var years = Math.floor(seconds / 31536000);
var max =2;
var current = 0;
var str = "";
if (years && current<max) {
    str+= years + 'y ';
    current++;
}
var days = Math.floor((seconds %= 31536000) / 86400);
if (days && current<max) {
    str+= days + 'd ';
    current++;
}
var hours = Math.floor((seconds %= 86400) / 3600);
if (hours && current<max) {
    str+= hours + 'h ';
    current++;
}
var minutes = Math.floor((seconds %= 3600) / 60);
if (minutes && current<max) {
    str+= minutes + 'm ';
    current++;
}
var seconds = seconds % 60;
if (seconds && current<max) {
    str+= seconds + 's ';
    current++;
}

return str;
}
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This is a solution. Later you can split by ":" and take the values of the array

 /**
 * Converts milliseconds to human readeable language separated by ":"
 * Example: 190980000 --> 2:05:3 --> 2days 5hours 3min
 */
function dhm(t){
    var cd = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000,
        ch = 60 * 60 * 1000,
        d = Math.floor(t / cd),
        h = '0' + Math.floor( (t - d * cd) / ch),
        m = '0' + Math.round( (t - d * cd - h * ch) / 60000);
    return [d, h.substr(-2), m.substr(-2)].join(':');
}

//Example
var delay = 190980000;                   
var fullTime = dhm(delay);
console.log(fullTime);
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millisToTime = function(ms){

    x = ms / 1000;
    seconds = Math.round(x % 60);
    x /= 60;
    minutes = Math.round(x % 60);
    x /= 60;
    hours = Math.round(x % 24);
    x /= 24;
    days = Math.round(x);

    return {"Days" : days, "Hours" : hours, "Minutes" : minutes, "Seconds" : seconds};
}

This will take milliseconds as an int, and give you an JSON object containing all the info you could need

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To show only what you need and not day 0, hours 0...

formatTime = function(time) {
        var ret = time % 1000 + ' ms';
        time = Math.floor(time / 1000);
        if (time !== 0) {
            ret = time % 60 + "s "+ret;
            time = Math.floor(time / 60);
            if (time !== 0) {
                ret = time % 60 + "min "+ret;
                time = Math.floor(time / 60);
                if (time !== 0) {
                    ret = time % 60 + "h "+ret;
                     ...
                }
            }           
        }
        return ret;
    };
share|improve this answer
    
I love it. It returns only part that are used (bigger than zero). btw. You cold remove space before "ms" cause other units don't have space before them. –  hrvoj3e Mar 8 at 20:12

I'm a big fan of objects, so I created this from https://metacpan.org/pod/Time::Seconds

Usage:

var human_readable = new TimeSeconds(986543).pretty(); // 11 days, 10 hours, 2 minutes, 23 seconds

;(function(w) {
  var interval = {
    second: 1,
    minute: 60,
    hour: 3600,
    day: 86400,
    week: 604800,
    month: 2629744, // year / 12
    year: 31556930 // 365.24225 days
  };

  var TimeSeconds = function(seconds) { this.val = seconds; };

  TimeSeconds.prototype.seconds = function() { return parseInt(this.val); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.minutes = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.minute); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.hours = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.hour); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.days = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.day); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.weeks = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.week); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.months = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.month); };
  TimeSeconds.prototype.years = function() { return parseInt(this.val / interval.year); };

  TimeSeconds.prototype.pretty = function(chunks) {
    var val = this.val;
    var str = [];

    if(!chunks) chunks = ['day', 'hour', 'minute', 'second'];

    while(chunks.length) {
      var i = chunks.shift();
      var x = parseInt(val / interval[i]);
      if(!x && chunks.length) continue;
      val -= interval[i] * x;
      str.push(x + ' ' + (x == 1 ? i : i + 's'));
    }

    return str.join(', ').replace(/^-/, 'minus ');
  };

  w.TimeSeconds = TimeSeconds;
})(window);
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If you are interested in an existing javascript library that does the job very well, you may want to check moment.js.

More specifically, the relevant moment.js piece for your question is durations.

Here are some examples of how you can take advantage of it to achieve your task:

var duration = moment.duration(31536000);

// Using the built-in humanize function:
console.log(duration.humanize());   // Output: "9 hours"
console.log(duration.humanize(true));   // Output: "in 9 hours"

moment.js has built-in support for 50+ human languages, so if you use the humanize() method you get multi-language support for free.

If you want to display the exact time information, you can take advantage of the moment-precise-range plug-in for moment.js that was created exactly for this purpose:

console.log(moment.preciseDiff(0, 39240754000);
// Output: 1 year 2 months 30 days 5 hours 12 minutes 34 seconds

One thing to note is that currently moment.js does not support weeks / days (in week) for duration object.

Hope this helps!

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I cleaned up one of the other answers a bit provides nice '10 seconds ago' style strings:

function msago (ms) {
    function suffix (number) { return ((number > 1) ? 's' : '') + ' ago'; }
    var temp = ms / 1000;
    var years = Math.floor(temp / 31536000);
    if (years) return years + ' year' + suffix(years);
    var days = Math.floor((temp %= 31536000) / 86400);
    if (days) return days + ' day' + suffix(days);
    var hours = Math.floor((temp %= 86400) / 3600);
    if (hours) return hours + ' hour' + suffix(hours);
    var minutes = Math.floor((temp %= 3600) / 60);
    if (minutes) return minutes + ' minute' + suffix(minutes);
    var seconds = Math.floor(temp % 60);
    if (seconds) return seconds + ' second' + suffix(seconds);
    return 'less then a second ago';
};
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Way more simple and readable.

milliseconds = 12345678;
mydate=new Date(milliseconds);
humandate=mydate.getUTCHours()+" hours, "+mydate.getUTCMinutes()+" minutes and "+mydate.getUTCSeconds()+" second(s)";

Which gives:

"3 hours, 25 minutes and 45 second(s)"

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very good answer, and if I needed to output a date 'Anno Domini', this would be the accepted answer. Instead, I needed to transform a time interval, into string like 1 month ago. Totally my fault, my question was not clear. Thanks to you it was noticed, and the question was updated. –  Dan Apr 19 at 19:31
    
Very interesting pitfall for those who have to deal with dates and time intervals. If we counted the epoch since 0, not since 1970, this problem would not exist. –  Dan Apr 19 at 19:33
    
Your code works good until the interval is less than one year, and when daylight saving is not taken into account. –  Dan Apr 19 at 19:36

I have attempted to modify Royi's answer to include weeks and monts, as well as build a text string but it seems it can't go past:

1 month 6 days 22 hours 59 minutes 59 seconds

Here is the code:

function parseAge(seconds) {
    var numyears = Math.floor(seconds / 31536000);
    var nummonths = Math.floor((seconds % 31536000) / 2419200);
    var numweeks = Math.floor(((seconds % 31536000) % 2419200) / 604800);
    var numdays = Math.floor((((seconds % 31536000) % 2419200) % 604800) / 86400);
    var numhours = Math.floor(((((seconds % 31536000) % 2419200) % 604800) % 86400) / 3600);
    var numminutes = Math.floor((((((seconds % 31536000) % 2419200) % 604800) % 86400) % 3600) / 60);
    var numseconds = (((((seconds % 31536000) % 2419200) % 604800) % 86400) % 3600) % 60;
    var str = '';
    if(numyears) {
        str = numyears;
        if(numyears == 1) {
            str += ' year '
        } else {
            str += ' years '
        }
    }
    if(nummonths) {
        str += nummonths;
        if(nummonths == 1) {
            str += ' month '
        } else {
            str += ' months '
        }
    }
    if(numweeks) {
        str += numweeks;
        if(numweeks == 1) {
            str += ' week '
        } else {
            str += ' weeks '
        }
    }
    if(numdays) {
        str += numdays;
        if(numdays == 1) {
            str += ' day '
        } else {
            str += ' days '
        }
    }
    if(numhours) {
        str += numhours;
        if(numhours == 1) {
            str += ' hour '
        } else {
            str += ' hours '
        }
    }
    if(numminutes) {
        str += numminutes;
        if(numminutes == 1) {
            str += ' minute '
        } else {
            str += ' minutes '
        }
    }
    if(numseconds) {
        str += numseconds;
        if(numseconds == 1) {
            str += ' second '
        } else {
            str += ' seconds '
        }
    }

    return str;
}

Does anyone know why?

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