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How it is possible that both static and non static java synchronized method running in parallel while writing java synchronized code ?

public class Counter{

   private static count = 0;

   public static synchronized  getCount()
   {
      return this.count;
   }

   public synchronized setCount(int count)
   {
      this.count = count;
   }
}
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Can you please post a code sample, to make the question more precise? –  wrschneider99 Nov 21 '11 at 14:16
    
@wrschneider99 now please give me the answer –  PENNY Nov 21 '11 at 14:23
    
Why is your getter a static method, but your setter is an instance method? –  Paul Bellora Nov 21 '11 at 14:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I still don't understand the question and I'm confused by your code example. You have static methods referencing "this.counter" yet "counter" is static.

In any event, to re-state some of the other answers, consider:

public static synchronized classMethod() {....}
public synchronized instanceMethod()  {...}

"synchronized" means two different things in each case. On classMethod, which is static, "synchronized" applies to the class object's (Counter.class) monitor, while instanceMethod's "synchronized" applies to the object instance's ("this") monitor.

As such, classMethod and instanceMethod will not lock each other. instanceMethod would block another non-static synchronized method, while classMethod would block other static synchronized methods.

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Static methods are synchronized on the class object while non static methods are synchronized on the particular instance of the class on which they are invoked. Thus they can execute in parallel since they are generally synchronized on different objects.

In the following example staticMethod1 is essentially the same as staticMethod2 and method1 is the same as method2 only that the latter versions use the object on which they are synchronized explicitly:

class MyClass
{
    static synchronized void staticMethod1()
    {
        doSomething();
    }

    static void staticMethod2()
    {
        synchronized( MyClass.class )
        {
            doSomething();
        }
    }

    synchronized void method1()
    {
        doSomething();
    }

    void method2()
    {
        synchronized( this )
        {
            doSomething();
        }
    }
}
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If you have class "Test", then non static synchronizes on this (the Test class instance), and static synchronizes on Test.class (i.e. the java.lang.Class class instance). So, yes, it's completely different objects, hence they could run in parallel.

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Java synchronization is based on the monitor concept. Every object can be a monitor, and every piece of synchronized code refers a monitor object. For synchronized static methods this is the class object. For synchronized instance methods it's the instance. For synchronized blocks, the monitor object is explicitly specified.

The important point: two threads can execute a piece of synchronized code in parallel if it's not synchronized on the same monitor object. If you have a synchronized static method, and a synchronized instance method, they cannot have the same monitor, so they can be executed in parallel.

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Methods are not locked, objects are locked. You can have two threads in the same synchronized method using different objects. However you can't have two threads running different synchronized methods of the same object.

static methods and non-static methods don't lock the same object.

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True - Putting synchronized on the method signature is equivalent to wrapping the entire method body in either "synchronized (this) {...}" or "synchronized (Foo.class) { ... } " depending on whether the method is static or not. If you use synchronized explicitly in the method body, you have more precise control over which object's monitor will be used for locking. –  wrschneider99 Nov 21 '11 at 14:59
1  
Also, if you are wait()ing you can have any number of threads in the synchronized block, but only one running. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 21 '11 at 15:36

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