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I read a bunch of input(sensors) where I get 0(off) or 1(on) for every sensor. These values I get in a char* where I have the result for all sensors. 1 bit for every sensor.

When I want to use these values in my code I don't feel like it is a good idea to AND this result with another char with the one bit set which i'm interested in since the code gets very bloated then.

Instead i was thinking of to make a struct like this one:

struct sensors {
    unsigned int Sensor0:1;
    unsigned int Sensor1:1;
    unsigned int Sensor2:1;
    unsigned int Sensor3:1;
    unsigned int Sensor4:1;
    unsigned int Sensor5:1;
    unsigned int Sensor6:1;
    unsigned int Sensor7:1;
}  

struct sensors s1;
memcpy(buf, (char*)&sensors, 1);

But from what I've read a struct might not save every component after each other in memory and might insert padding and other stuff in between which makes this a no go.

Am I wrong about this? Are there any better ways to do this?

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I can't give you a definitive answer but maybe you should change unsigned int Sensor0:1; to unsigned char Sensor0:1; to avoid problems with endianess. I would expect this to work well then. –  x4u Nov 21 '11 at 14:51
    
I'd totally use the bitwise operations. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 21 '11 at 14:52
    
@Kiril: if you want your code to look more hackerish, definitely yes :-) –  Blagovest Buyukliev Nov 21 '11 at 14:57
    
@BlagovestBuyukliev - hackerish - maybe no, but sexy - definitely XD –  Kiril Kirov Nov 21 '11 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To add to Blagovest's answer:

A bit-field approach seems sound. However, you'll have to instruct your compiler to not introduce a padding between the fields. For GCC, this is done by putting __attribute__ ((packed)) after the definition of a structure, like this:

struct sensors {
    unsigned char Sensor0:1;
    unsigned char Sensor1:1;
    unsigned char Sensor2:1;
    unsigned char Sensor3:1;
    unsigned char Sensor4:1;
    unsigned char Sensor5:1;
    unsigned char Sensor6:1;
    unsigned char Sensor7:1;
} __attribute__ ((packed)); 

Note that GCC before 4.4 used to introduce padding for char fields irrespective of this directive; see the documentation on warning option -Wpacked-bitfield-compat for more information.

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With your current definition of struct sensors, the compiler will insert additional padding because int has alignment requirements, usually on a sizeof(int) boundary. Moreover, int must be wider than char, hence it can accommodate more than 8 flags, which you're not gonna need.

If you declare it like this (use unsigned char instead), there should be no padding because char has the least strict alignment requirements:

struct sensors {
    unsigned char Sensor0:1;
    unsigned char Sensor1:1;
    unsigned char Sensor2:1;
    unsigned char Sensor3:1;
    unsigned char Sensor4:1;
    unsigned char Sensor5:1;
    unsigned char Sensor6:1;
    unsigned char Sensor7:1;
}

This might not work only on a very strange platform where CHAR_BIT != 8.

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Great, will try this. Thx for the reply. –  chiefi Nov 21 '11 at 15:02

If you want to be super-safe, you can AND with a character that has one bit set. You probably would want to do this with an array, instead of a struct. You can wrap it into a nice loop, and it's not much work at all.

However, any sane C compiler will put unsigned integers in contiguous memory, so it should be safe to do some kind of copy like that. The compiler usually only puts in extra padding when there are types of different sizes. Unfortunately I do not know if this will work easily for you because you have the command memcpy(buf, (char*)&sensors, 1) will copy your byte of sensor data in the first integer - which is not what you want.

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Doesn't the :1 mean that I only use 1 bit of the integer and it should work as I want? or? –  chiefi Nov 21 '11 at 14:59
    
Ah! I wasn't sure what the :1 meant. Hadn't seen that before. If it does that I would revise my answer to, "I have no idea how the compiler would pack those into memory, so I would just use characters with 1 bit set. Not that using memcpy won't work." –  bchurchill Nov 21 '11 at 15:09

Instead of memcpy(), I would use a union to access the data as defined in Blagovest Buyukliev answer:

union combSensors {
    unsigned char all_fields;
    struct sensors field_by_field;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Never heard of union before but it sounds like it might be a good way to go. –  chiefi Nov 21 '11 at 15:06

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