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For the sake of validation, I decided to try using the @Html.TextBoxFor so that validation is quick and easy. However, there is not an option to set the value, and I assume it's done automatically, but it isn't being automatically set.

Controller:

        MyLibrary.MyProspect prospect = MyLib.GetProspect(ID);
        return View(prospect);

View:

@model MyLibrary.MyProspect

@using (Html.BeginForm("Update", "Prospects"))
{
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)
    <fieldset>
        <legend>Edit</legend>

        @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name)
        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Name)
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name)

My library defination of Prospect:

public class MyProspect
{
    public String Name { get; set; }
}

My guess is that at no point do I set the model to actually be my prospect. But no examples I have come across do this, and I assume I pass it from view as I have?

SOLVED This is working code, Id just mixed and matched my controller action to the wrong view.

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3  
Is the problem that the textbox is empty when viewed in the browser? –  Dallas Nov 21 '11 at 14:57
3  
Have you checked with debug if the values ​​are returned on GetProspect? –  wnascimento Nov 21 '11 at 15:00
    
the values are all fine, I origionally used a normal text box. and populated it with the given option. @Html.TextBox("Name", (String)ViewBag.Prospect.Name) And yes, the textboxfor is empty –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:08
1  
Your code look right. In your comment you write about ViewBag?? Thats a totally different story. –  Jan Nov 21 '11 at 15:15
1  
Could you show your entire controller action? –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 21 '11 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For client side validation to work there are a couple of things you need to do:

  1. Decorate some fields in your model using the appropriate DataAnnotations
  2. Ensure you have the ClientValidationEnabled & UnobtrusiveJavaScriptEnabled options set to true. This can be done directly in the <appSettings>.
  3. Include the appropriate libraries in the page i.e. jquery.validate.min.js and jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js

Also if you have no special view requirements you could reduce your code to:

@Html.EditorForModel()
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using @Html.EditorForModel() , All 12 fields have boxes for them, yet all 12 are blank. is the instance of the prospect correctly set? I'll try the 1-3 things you mentioned. –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:22
    
Bit silly what Id done really, Mix and matched the wrong action and view. But thanks a ton for the new bit of code, I like neat :) –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:28
1  
No problem :) If you do need to customize your view and you want to still stick with the EditorForModel approach, you can create custom templates - see bradwilson.typepad.com/blog/2009/10/… for a good tutorial. –  James Nov 21 '11 at 19:36

The code you have written looks correct, I would guess your problem is in MyLib.GetProspect(ID) not setting the value of the Name field.

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This is definately not the case. Successfully show it on screen using @Html.TextBox("Name", (String)ViewBag.Prospect.Name) Where ViewBag.Prospect = prospect. But thanks for the suggestion –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:16

@model MyLibrary.MyProspect This line sets your model to be MyProspect.

Do you have DataAnnotations on your MyProspect.Name property?

Maybe adding your definition of MyProspect.Name to you question would help as well.

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Added to question. That line @model MyLibrary.MyProspect sets the model to MyProspect, but it doesnt say that the instance it is using is prospect? –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:11
1  
@Doomsknight - Well done - an easier way to check if you have the right data in your model than using viewbag, is to use the @Model (notice the capital M) and just do <span>Name is @Model.Name</span> and that gives you the value without it being dependant on an HTML Helper. –  K. Bob Nov 21 '11 at 15:36
    
Cheers, that will save me a headache next time! Never thought to do it. –  Doomsknight Nov 21 '11 at 15:45

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