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Possible Duplicate:
In Perl, how can find the date of the previous Monday for a given date?

In the perl, how to write a function to get last Thursday's date? Today (11/21), I want to get 11/17. How can I figure out if a given date is a Sunday or not?

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marked as duplicate by Wooble, cjm, Sinan Ünür, daxim, Justin Ethier Nov 21 '11 at 20:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
possible duplicate of Get previous Monday for a given date in Perl (my answer there is generalized to any day-of-week). –  cjm Nov 21 '11 at 16:34
    
Highly related: Timestamp of last monday –  daxim Nov 21 '11 at 17:59
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8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Seems like a work for DateTime (which is the module usually recommended to manipulate dates in Perl). This small example should answer both your questions:

use strict;
use warnings;

use DateTime;

my $d = DateTime->now;

while ( $d->day_of_week != 4 ) {
    $d->subtract( days => 1 );
}

print $d->ymd;
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do we have function to convert to this format: '20111117' ? –  user595234 Nov 21 '11 at 15:32
    
yes. DateTime implements a strftime() method. The documentation gives you details about the format directives: metacpan.org/module/DateTime#strftime-Patterns –  larsen Nov 21 '11 at 15:34
3  
print $d->ymd(''); –  Chris Charley Nov 21 '11 at 15:43
    
This can give the wrong result. See my solution for details. –  ikegami Nov 21 '11 at 19:05
    
@ikegami you're right. thanks –  larsen Nov 21 '11 at 22:50
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Other posts use DateTime too, but they have issues this post addresses.

use DateTime qw( );
my $dt = DateTime->today( time_zone => 'local' );
$dt->subtract( days => ($dt->day_of_week - 4) % 7 );
say $dt->ymd('');  # 20111117

Issues addressed:

  • Uses the local date instead of the date in or near England.
  • Uses today instead of now since you're only dealing with dates.
  • Avoids needless loops.

Note:

  • Returns the current date is today is a Thursday. You accepted an answer that did the same, so I presume that's what you want.

Update: The above can fail on certain days for certain time zones. (Not all days have a midnight!) Solution:

use DateTime qw( );
my $dt = DateTime->now( time_zone => 'local' );
$dt->set_time_zone('floating');
$dt->truncate( to => 'days' );
$dt->subtract( days => ($dt->day_of_week - 4) % 7 );
say $dt->ymd('');  # 20111117
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Running your code on Monday 2011-11-21, I get 20111118, not 20111117. I had better luck with '$dt->subtract( days => ($dt->day_of_week + 7 - 4) % 7 );' –  Chris Charley Nov 22 '11 at 0:24
    
@Chris Charley, I had the operands reversed. Fixed. Your + 7 is useless. ($x + 7) % 7 is the same as $x % 7. –  ikegami Nov 22 '11 at 1:30
    
I have read about modulo a negative number but I didn't really understand them. From this problem I think I see how they work. If -13 % 7, then the result of division would be -2 with a remainder of +1, (equal -13). –  Chris Charley Nov 23 '11 at 0:43
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I'd use what larsen wrote, although reading the localtime reference won't hurt you. You could do something like this to check if its Sunday:

($second, $minute, $hour, $dayOfMonth, $month, $yearOffset, 
                         $dayOfWeek, $dayOfYear, $daylightSavings) = localtime();
if ($dayOfWeek == 0) print("Don't go to work!");
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If all you wanted to test was the day-of-the-week an array slice of the localtime() works nicely:

print q(Today is Sunday) if ((localtime)[6]==0)
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You can also use Date::Calc:

How do I calculate the last and the next Saturday for any given date?

  use Date::Calc qw( Today Day_of_Week Add_Delta_Days
                     Day_of_Week_to_Text Date_to_Text );

  $searching_dow = 6; # 6 = Saturday

  @today = Today();

  $current_dow = Day_of_Week(@today);

  if ($searching_dow == $current_dow)
  {
      @prev = Add_Delta_Days(@today,-7);
      @next = Add_Delta_Days(@today,+7);
  }
  else
  {
      if ($searching_dow > $current_dow)
      {
          @next = Add_Delta_Days(@today,
                    $searching_dow - $current_dow);
          @prev = Add_Delta_Days(@next,-7);
      }
      else
      {
          @prev = Add_Delta_Days(@today,
                    $searching_dow - $current_dow);
          @next = Add_Delta_Days(@prev,+7);
      }
  }

  $dow = Day_of_Week_to_Text($searching_dow);

  print "Today is:      ", ' ' x length($dow),
                               Date_to_Text(@today), "\n";
  print "Last $dow was:     ", Date_to_Text(@prev),  "\n";
  print "Next $dow will be: ", Date_to_Text(@next),  "\n";
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Whose date does Today return? Local or UTC? –  ikegami Nov 21 '11 at 18:57
    
As the documentation (linked above) states, Today() is localtime. Today('utc') (or invoked with any true value), will give you UTC. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 21 '11 at 19:04
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use Date::Calc qw(:all);

($week, $year) = Week_of_Year(Today());# Week_of_Year(2011,11,21);
print Date_to_Text(Add_Delta_Days(Monday_of_Week($week - 1,$year),3));#THU - MON = 3
#output:Thu 17-Nov-2011

#isSunday?
Day_of_Week(2011,11,20) == 7 # 7 is Sunday enum code(from 1 : Monday)
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With just localtime and the POSIX base module, you can do this:

my @ltime = localtime();
my $t 
    = POSIX::mktime(( 0 ) x 3
    , $ltime[3] - ( 7 - 4 + $ltime[6] )
    , @ltime[4,5] 
    );

This will always give you the last Thursday before the last Sunday. So if the day is Saturday, it will give you the previous week's Thursday, but if it's Sunday, it will give you the last past Thursday.

If you prefer the last past Thursday computation, you might do this:

my $t 
    = POSIX::mktime(( 0 ) x 3
    , $ltime[3] - $ltime[6] + ( $ltime[6] > 4 ?  4 : -3 )
    , @ltime[4,5] 
    );
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Negative values aren't valid for mktime, so it can't possibly "always give you the last Thursday before the last Sunday". (tm_mday: The day of the month, in the range 1 to 31.) –  ikegami Nov 21 '11 at 19:02
    
@ikegami negative values have worked in mktime every time I've tried them. –  Axeman Nov 22 '11 at 0:04
    
Negative values most certainly are valid for mktime; mktime will happily convert any out-of-range values in any fields by borrow/carry on higher fields. It is entirely this ability of it that makes it so simple and useful in this sort of calculation –  LeoNerd Sep 9 '12 at 19:59
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Date::Simple has a pretty clean interface.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Date::Simple qw/ today /;

my $d = today;

# If today is already Thurs, subtract 1 before searching for prior Thursday.
# If today is Thurs and you want to capture that (and not Thur a week ago),
# don't subtract the 1 from $d.
$d--; 

$d-- while $d->day_of_week != 4;    
print $d->strftime("%Y%m%d");
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Whose date does today return? Local or UTC? –  ikegami Nov 21 '11 at 18:59
    
@ikegami Not sure. Looking thru the source, there is some function like _gmtime(), but afraid I can't read the code well enough to see if local time is used or UTC. Printing the date after 00:00 UTC still gave me today's date ((New_York time zone, EST). –  Chris Charley Nov 22 '11 at 5:01
    
It uses my ( $y, $m, $d ) = (localtime)[ 5, 4, 3 ]; $y += 1900; $m += 1; return $_[0]->_ymd( $y, $m, $d );, so local date. –  ikegami Nov 22 '11 at 7:05
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