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I would like to know if Nokogiri XPath or CSS parsing works faster with HTML files. How is the speed different?

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4  
See Benchmark. –  Guilherme Bernal Nov 21 '11 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Nokogiri doesn't have XPath or CSS parsing. It parses XML/HTML into a single DOM that you can then use CSS or XPath syntax to query.

CSS selectors are internally turned into XPath before asking libxml2 to perform the query. As such (for the exact same selectors) the XPath version would be a tiny fraction faster, since the CSS does not need to be converted into XPath first.

However, your question has no general answer; it depends on what you are selecting for, and what your XPath looks like. Chances are, you wouldn't be writing the same XPath as Nokogiri creates. For example, see if you can guess the XPath for the following two CSS statements:

puts Nokogiri::CSS.xpath_for('#foo')
#=> //*[@id = 'foo']


puts Nokogiri::CSS.xpath_for 'div.article a.external'
#=> //div[contains(concat(' ', @class, ' '), ' article ')]//a[contains(concat(' ', @class, ' '), ' external ')]

Unlike a Web browser, id and class attributes have no sped-up cache, so selecting for them does not help. Indeed, the general interpretation of div.article involves far more work than something like div[@class='article'].

As @LBg commented, you should benchmark for yourself if absolute speed is critical.

However, I would suggest this: don't worry about it. Computers are fast. Write what is most convenient for you, the programmer. If a CSS selector is easier to craft, faster to type, and easier to understand when reviewing your code later, use that. Use XPath when you need to do things that you cannot do with the CSS selector syntax.

How long does it take Nokogiri to convert a reasonably complex CSS to XPath?

t = Time.now
1000.times do |i|
  # Use a different CSS string each time to avoid built-in caching
  css = "body#foo table#bar#{i} thead th, body#foo table#bar#{i} tbody td"
  Nokogiri::CSS.xpath_for(css)
end
puts (Time.now - t)/1000
#=> 0.000405041

Less than half a millisecond.

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Hmm, that's exactly the XPath I would write. :) The second one uses the class "trick" you have to use when parsing an HTML class attribute, which can have multiple values separated by spaces. –  Mark Thomas Nov 21 '11 at 18:34
    
@Phrogz, "CSS selectors are internally turned into XPath before asking libxml2 to perform the query. As such (for the exact same selectors) the XPath version would be a tiny fraction faster, since the CSS does not need to be converted into XPath first." You forgot to allow for the head scratching time trying to remember how to write the accessor in XPath. :-) –  the Tin Man Nov 21 '11 at 23:31
2  
+1 for "don't worry about it". Zactly! Easier to understand has long term benefits in maintenance of the code. I don't worry as much about the computer's time, it's my time spent trying to understand what was written that concerns me. –  the Tin Man Nov 21 '11 at 23:32
    
Thanks! That clears my mind. –  TonyTakeshi Nov 22 '11 at 13:56

I was curious about the same thing. Using a 1.4mb html file. The css and xpath generated from css are roughly the same. Using an xpath that returns the same results for the file I'm working with takes roughly 1/2 the time:

require 'nokogiri'
require 'benchmark'

doc = Nokogiri::HTML File.read(File.join('data', 'input.html'))

Benchmark.bm(15) do |x|
  x.report('css:') {(1..1000).each {doc.css("span div.text1[align='center']")}}
  x.report('xpath from css:') {(1..1000).each {doc.xpath("//span//div[contains(concat(' ', normalize-space(@class), ' '), ' text1 ') and @align = 'center']")}}
  x.report('xpath:') {(1..1000).each {doc.xpath("//span//div[@class='text1'][@align='center']")}}
end

#=>                   user     system      total        real
css:             61.830000   0.110000  61.940000 ( 61.993388)
xpath from css:  61.750000   0.120000  61.870000 ( 61.925088)
xpath:           27.100000   0.100000  27.200000 ( 27.232258)
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This is incorrect, you are passing an XPath string to the .css method. –  Mark Thomas Aug 20 '14 at 13:55
    
Thanks for pointing that out. Still returned similar results. –  garrett Kocher Aug 20 '14 at 21:57
    
Of course it did. As stated by Phrogz' answer back in 2011: Compared to the time and memory needed to parse the XML into the DOM, the query syntax translation from CSS to XPath is trivial. –  Mark Thomas Aug 21 '14 at 1:20
    
Also note that your XPath is NOT equivalent to the CSS, which is why it is faster. This benchmark proves nothing. –  Mark Thomas Aug 21 '14 at 1:26

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