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I would like to do some stuff after before or after new has run.

function F() {

    this.init = function  () { alert(0) }

}

F.prototype.init = function () { alert(1) }

new F().init(); // Will not run mine, because on new F(), init is reassigned within the class.

I understand I can create my own method function Create() { new F().init() }

But I was wondering if there is a way to hook into the new Function call ?

I hope you understand what I mean.

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What should be alerted exactly, in what order? –  pimvdb Nov 21 '11 at 15:52
    
No order, just the second one @OrangeDog's answer is the one I am looking for. –  momo Nov 21 '11 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

new is not a function call, F() is. You could do something like this, replacing F with your own delegate.

function F() {
    this.init = function  () { alert(0) }
}

var oldF = F;
F = function() {
    oldF.apply(this, arguments);
    this.init = function() { alert(1); };
};

new F().init();

If you want a utility function to do this kind of thing:

function wrap(constructor, config) {
    return function() {
        constructor.apply(this, arguments);
        for (var key in config) {
            this[key] = config[key];
        }
    }
}

F = wrap(F, {init: function() { alert(1); }});

or use one of many frameworks/libraries (ExtJS, jQuery, Prototype) that provides this stuff.

Following discussion

This can start you off on what you're trying to do, but I don't guarantee it works in all situations or implementations (only tested on V8). You could pass the context in which F exists as an additional parameter, or make sure you apply/bind/call extend with it.

function extend(constructor, config) {
    this[constructor.name] = function() {
        constructor.apply(this, arguments);
        for (var key in config) {
            this[key] = config[key];
        }
    }
}

extend(F, {init: function() { alert(1); }});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, exactly my intention! However :( ... Is there a way to do this while not having direct access to the F class, but rather to a parameter ( having it passed ) ... function ( clazz ) { clazz = function () { clazz.apply(this, arguments); this.init(); } ... Is there a way in javascript to set a the reference rathern than the parameter ? :S –  momo Nov 21 '11 at 16:12
    
I am guessing no ? –  momo Nov 21 '11 at 16:28
    
Not sure what you're asking. How can you not have access to F if you're calling new F()? –  OrangeDog Nov 21 '11 at 19:50
    
What I meant was, I do not have direct access to F. I have a method that takes F, G, H and so on, and I want to do the same for each and one of them. That is why I want to declare a method, that takes a class ( or constructor as you've callin' it ) and rewrites that class. Basically rebind(clazz) { // do the all magic within this method )... So I have access to F through a reference = clazz. I would prefer not to have to return anything, but set the clazz within the method. I understand that this difficult in an OO language. I wish all objects had a method call, obj.replaceMe(...) or something –  momo Nov 22 '11 at 7:18
    
I'm calling it a constructor because that's what it is; there's no such thing as class or method or reference in JavaScript. There's no equivalent in JavaScript to C++ pointers or references, so what you ask is impossible (and also unnecessary). Try reading up on scope and inheritance in JavaScript. –  OrangeDog Nov 22 '11 at 9:55

Constructors in javascript are just like any other methods, what you're really looking for is AOP in javascript.

See this SO question for some good AOP libraries for javascript.

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