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Table 1 : (Company)

ID Name
1  A
2  B
3  C

Each company (pk = ID) can have one or more employees.

Table 2 :  (Employee)  (CompanyID referencing ID)

CompanyID EmpID Name
1         1     Joe
1         2     Doe
1         3     Boe
2         4     Lou
3         5     Su  
3         6     Ram

Query :

select CompanyID, count(*) from Employee group by CompanyID having count(*) > 1; # Lists companies and their counts.

CompanyID count(*)
1         3  
3         2

For this query, I want just one result with the count of distinct CompanyIDs. So, '2' in this case [Companies A and C].

In short, I am looking for number of companies with 2 or more employees.

Is there anyway to get the result without a temp table or a join? I am using MySQL.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes:

select count(*) from
(select CompanyID from Employee group by CompanyID having count(*) > 1) v

or for ranges:

select count(*) from
(select CompanyID from Employee group by CompanyID 
 having count(*) >= 5 and count(*) < 10) v
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I was contemplating on this solution but I thought this might not be the most efficient. May be it is! Thanks... –  ThinkCode Nov 21 '11 at 17:20
    
Can we do count(*) on ranges? Say, number of companies with 5 or more employees but less than 10? –  ThinkCode Nov 21 '11 at 17:24
1  
@ThinkCode: Yes - see edited answer. –  Mark Bannister Nov 21 '11 at 17:31
    
Sorry, I got it : having count() >= 5 or count() < 10 –  ThinkCode Nov 21 '11 at 17:33

Yes, it's possible with subqueries:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM
  ( SELECT 1
    FROM Employee 
    GROUP BY CompanyID 
    HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
  ) AS grp

or:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT CompanyID) 
FROM Employee AS e
WHERE EXISTS
      ( SELECT *
        FROM Employee AS e2
        WHERE e2.CompanyID = e.CompanyId
          AND e2.EmpID <> e.EmpID
      )

or perhaps if COUNT(*) is slow, you can use MIN() and MAX():

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM
  ( SELECT 1 
    FROM Employee 
    GROUP BY CompanyID 
    HAVING MAX(EmpID) > MIN(EmpId)
  ) AS grp
share|improve this answer
    
Error Code: 1248. Every derived table must have its own alias. So an alias is required I guess.. –  ThinkCode Nov 21 '11 at 17:26
    
Yes, aliases are needed in subqueries. –  ypercube Nov 21 '11 at 17:36

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