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$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
    var X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
        
    $("#canvas").mouseup(function(e){
        var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
        var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
        alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);
    });
});

The problem I'm having with this is that after the first time the function is called (the first time works fine, and as expected) the mouseup function seems to be called multiple time (i.e. multiple alerts will display instead of just the first). Is there a way to prevent this from happening, or a better way to code this?

Thanks

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My guess would be that you need to escape the function somehow. Maybe try adding a return to the bottom of the mouseup function. –  Kevin Anthony Oppegaard Rose Nov 21 '11 at 17:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

that's because the mouseup event is bound every time mousedown event fires.
you can simply add $("#canvas").unbind('mouseup'); at the end of mouseup function.

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
        var X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
        var Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;

        $("#canvas").mouseup(function(e){
            var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
            var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
            alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);
            $("#canvas").unbind('mouseup');
        });
});
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1  
I wouldnt consider rebind/unbind on every event as a good solution. However I see the point if the mouseup event must not trigger if the mousedown hasn't been triggered first, but that can be solved in other ways. –  Tobias Nov 21 '11 at 17:38
    
absolutely, i didn't want to criticize. but there are better ways to do this. example: use a flag in between that gets set on mousedown and cleared on mouse up after being tested. –  UnLoCo Nov 21 '11 at 18:21
    
I think it's a good answer because it keeps close to what the author making/wanting. Of course, add and remove listener, call $("#canvas") or even $(this) as I wrote aren't good approaching. But change it, change the idea of the question. –  Orlando Leite Nov 21 '11 at 18:35

Your code attaches a new mouseup handler to the #canvas element every time you move the mouse. Use .one() to attach the handler only once:

$(this).one('mouseup', function(e){
    var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
    alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);
});

But a better solution would be to use a state variable (and proper scope):

var clicked = false;
var X1, Y1, X2, Y2;

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
    X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;

    clicked = true;
});


$("#canvas").mouseup(function(e){
    if (clicked) {
        X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
        Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
        alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);

        clicked = false;
    }
});
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that's the flag i was talking about, thank you –  UnLoCo Nov 21 '11 at 22:54

The correct code is:

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
    var X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
}).mouseup(function(e){
    var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
    alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);
});

You are rewritting the mouseup all the time you call mousedown.

EDIT

Sorry, keeping the things where you want:

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
    var X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;

    $(this).mouseup(function(e){
        var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
        var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
        alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " Y1 + " " + Y2);
        $(this).unbind("mouseup");
    });
});
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2  
That doesn't work though, because X1 and Y1 are now out of scope –  Eric Nov 21 '11 at 17:23

This is because you register a new listener for mouseup everytime the mousedown is run. You should move the code for mouseup outside the mousedown function.

Regards
Tobias

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We ended up using a combination of a few different answers here:

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){
    var X1 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
    var Y1 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;

    $(this).mouseup(function(e){
        var X2 = (e.pageX - this.offsetLeft) - 8;
        var Y2 = (e.pageY - this.offsetTop) - 8;
        alert(X1 + " " + X2 + " " + Y1 + " " + Y2);
        $(this).unbind("mouseup");
    });
    $(this).unbind("mousedown);
});
share|improve this answer
    
he doesn't want to unbind mousedown !! –  UnLoCo Nov 21 '11 at 18:22

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