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As far as I understand the RAII idiom when applied to resources needed by a class (and please correct me if I'm wrong), a class that requires a resource should define a member of the appropriate type, and its destructor will be called automatically when the using class instance is destroyed, like this:

class Skybox
{
    public:
        Skybox() : tex_(...) {}

    private:
        Texture tex_;
};

Apart from using a smart pointer to allocate the resource on the heap, how can this pattern be applied if the resource member requires some code to be executed in the Skybox constructor, before the initialisation of the resource? For example:

class Skybox
{
    public:
        Skybox(const std::string& fileName);

    private:
        Texture tex_;
}

Skybox::Skybox(const std::string& fileName)
{
    // read stuff from skybox initialization file
    // including various texture parameters such as texture file
    ...
    // initialize tex_ based on information read above
}

Update: the Texture class requires all initialization to be performed in its constructor (i.e. no Texture::Init() method is available)

share|improve this question
    
Does the Texture class allow later initialization, like tex_.init(...)? – Kerrek SB Nov 21 '11 at 17:29
    
No, it does not. I will update the question text. – Dan Nestor Nov 21 '11 at 17:32
    
Is there any pre-computation that needs to be used for anything other than initializing tex? If not, just create a constructor for Texture that takes a filename and does all of that processing as part of its own initialization. – matthias Nov 21 '11 at 17:44
    
You are coupling oddly here. Skybox doesn't need to know anything about filepaths. Skybox only needs to be passed in a Texture. Let Texture or a further abstraction handle your knowledge of the file system. – Tom Kerr Nov 21 '11 at 20:45
    
Sorry, I should have been more explicit. I am also reading a skybox initialization file. I will update the question. – Dan Nestor Nov 21 '11 at 21:37
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Wrap the initialization code into a function, and use that function (member or non-member, static or non-static, as appropriate) to initialize the member variable:

Texture Skybox::init_tex(std::string const& fileName) {
  // read stuff from file, including textureFile
  // initialize result
  return Texture(...);
}

Skybox::Skybox(std::string const& fileName):
  tex_(init_tex(fileName))
{ }

The initialization function should probably be a static function. If it isn't, be careful not to use any members that haven't been initialized yet — you're calling init_tex on a not-yet-fully initialized Skybox instance.

share|improve this answer
3  
Nice. Should that be a static function, to be safe? – Kerrek SB Nov 21 '11 at 17:30
4  
Using non-static member functions in the constructor requires a lot of care and non-local guarantees. A static member function would obviate all those worries. – Kerrek SB Nov 21 '11 at 17:32
1  
Make it a lambda! – R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 21 '11 at 17:34
    
I don't really agree with this. The loading of the Texture shouldn't be coupled to the Skybox. I'd rather have a free function to do this. – pmr Nov 21 '11 at 18:11
    
@Pmr, if the texture could be created solely from a file name, then we might expect it to have a constructor that accepts a file name. Instead, it seems there are some skybox-specific aspects to how a texture is loaded from a file — maybe the texture is embedded in a special "skybox" file format. – Rob Kennedy Nov 21 '11 at 18:14

Maybe you should encapsulate the creation of a texture into a free function as the reading of the file seems unrelated to the Skybox and could possibly useful somewhere else. I guess another name for this is Factory.

Tex tex_from_file(const std::string&) {
  // ...
}

class Skybox {
  Skybox(const std::string& s) : tex_(tex_from_file(s)) {}
};

Even nicer would be a Skybox constructible from a Tex object. However, this requires Tex to be copy or move constructible. If this isn't the case a proper workaround could be to return a std::unique_ptr<Tex>.

share|improve this answer

Using C++11 features (variadic templates and perfect forwarding), this can be achieved thanks to a template constructor :

#include <utility>
template<class T>
class raii_wrapper
{
    public:

template<typename... Arg>
    raii_wrapper(Arg&&... args) : obj(std::forward<Arg>(args)...) {}

    private:
        T obj;
};

struct foo
{
    foo(){}
};

struct foo_1
{
    foo_1(int){}
};

struct foo_2
{
    foo_2(int,int&){}
};

int main()
{
    raii_wrapper<foo> f;
    raii_wrapper<foo_1> f1(1);
    int i(3);
    raii_wrapper<foo_2> f2(1,i);
    return 0;
}

In C++03/98, template constructor is still the solution (but boost shall help for variadic template and argument passing). See implementations of functions like make_share_ptr.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this helps. – R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 21 '11 at 18:06
1  
Could you please change your code so it relates directly to the Skybox and Texture classes in the example? – Rob Kennedy Nov 21 '11 at 18:18

If the Texture class has a default constructor and supports swapping, you can initialize the resource with a local variable and swap it at the end of the constructor.

Skybox::Skybox(const std::string& fileName)
{
    Texture localTex(fileName);
    //...
    tex_.swap(localTex);
}
share|improve this answer

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