Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a text file and i want to to read it line by line and put the lines into an array.

The snippet behind gives error while compiling:

FILE *f;
char line[LINE_SIZE];
char *lines;
int num_righe;

f = fopen("spese.dat", "r");

if(f == NULL) {
	f = fopen("spese.dat", "w");
}

while(fgets(line, LINE_SIZE, f)) {		
	num_righe++;
	lines = realloc(lines, (sizeof(char)*LINE_SIZE)*num_righe);
	strcpy(lines[num_righe-1], line);
}

fclose(f);

The error is:

spese.c:29: warning: assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast
spese.c:30: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strcpy’
spese.c:30: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘strcpy’ makes pointer from integer without a cast

Any help? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
you should really include the header #include <string.h> into your program. Good that you haven't done -fno-builtin, in which case it could not have warned you and the program would have silently been compiled by gcc. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 4 '09 at 19:41
    
I'm dubious about the value of the if (!f) fopen("spese.dat", "w"); part. If that condition happens, f is open for write, and fgets() cannot succeed. Also a little more error checking would be a good thing throughout, especially of realloc() where it will return NULL on failure without freeing the old buffer. –  RBerteig May 5 '09 at 0:53
    
@RBerteig. I agree, error checking is far from present. –  Tom May 5 '09 at 2:05
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try:

FILE *f;
char line[LINE_SIZE];
char **lines = NULL;
int num_righe = 0;

f = fopen("spese.dat", "r");

if(f == NULL) {
        f = fopen("spese.dat", "w");
}

while(fgets(line, LINE_SIZE, f)) {              
        num_righe++;
        lines = (char**)realloc(lines, sizeof(char*)*num_righe);
        lines[num_righe-1] = strdup(line);
}

fclose(f);
share|improve this answer
    
isn't sizeof(char) always identical to 1 byte? –  Tom May 4 '09 at 19:44
    
Yes. But my code uses sizeof(char*) which in general is 4 bytes, not 1. –  Emil H May 4 '09 at 19:44
    
Oh, didn't notice that *. I apologize. –  Tom May 4 '09 at 19:45
    
Don't worry about it. Can happen to anyone. :) –  Emil H May 4 '09 at 19:47
    
it worked, thank you very much :) –  pistacchio May 4 '09 at 19:50
show 1 more comment

I take this is a code snipet, consequently, i guess that you are alredy including string.h

strcpy is defined as:

  char * strcpy ( char * destination, const char * source );

In

 strcpy(lines[num_righe-1], line);

lines [num_righe-1] is a char, not a char*

So it should be

strcpy(lines + (num_righe-1), line);

As munificent wrote, it looks like you are trying to make lines an array of strings. If so, your definition of lines is wrong.

Also, dont forget, you should check that realloc doesn't return NULL.

lines = realloc(lines, (sizeof(char)*LINE_SIZE)*num_righe);

if (!lines) //MUST HANDLE NULL POINTER!!

/* string copy code here*/
share|improve this answer
    
Aren't these statements identical? –  samoz May 4 '09 at 19:35
1  
No. lines[num_righe-1] is a char, and lines + (num_righe-1) is a pointer to the same char. One could also use &lines[num_right-1]. –  Emil H May 4 '09 at 19:36
    
There is no need to cast when using realloc. –  anon May 4 '09 at 19:42
    
@Neil. I was dubitative about that one. It's gone. –  Tom May 4 '09 at 19:48
add comment

lines is a pointer to a character, i.e. a single string. You want it to be an array of strings. For that, it should be char **lines;

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use fscanf instead to do what you want.

fscanf(f, "%s\n", line[index]);
index++;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.