Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a table parent with primary key id, and a table child with foreign key parent_id and a "boolean" column (constrained to a 0 or 1), let's call it is_initial.

What I want to do is put a constraint on child so that for a particular value of parent_id, there can be only one row with is_initial = 1. There can be any number of rows with is_initial = 0.

Can this be done with a constraint? I prefer not to add a trigger.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here you go, I believe I understand what you are looking for now

Note the change in the unique index:

create unique index childTable_initialIndex on childTable(
  case when is_initial = 1 then parent_id 
  else null
  end);

Ammended Code

create table childTable(parent_id number, child_id number primary key, is_initial number, somethingelse varchar2(50) );

create unique index childTable_initialIndex on childTable(
  case when is_initial = 1 then parent_id 
  else null
  end);


  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (1,1,0,'works');
1 rows inserted.  

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (1,1,0,'will not work if childId is pk');
SQL Error: ORA-00001: unique constraint (SYS_C0062138) violated
00001. 00000 -  "unique constraint (%s.%s) violated"
*Cause:    An UPDATE or INSERT statement attempted to insert a duplicate key.
           For Trusted Oracle configured in DBMS MAC mode, you may see
           this message if a duplicate entry exists at a different level.
*Action:   Either remove the unique restriction or do not insert the key  

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (1,2,1,'works3');
1 rows inserted.  

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (1,3,1,'should not work');
SQL Error: ORA-00001: unique constraint (CHILDTABLE_INITIALINDEX) violated
00001. 00000 -  "unique constraint (%s.%s) violated"
*Cause:    An UPDATE or INSERT statement attempted to insert a duplicate key.
           For Trusted Oracle configured in DBMS MAC mode, you may see
           this message if a duplicate entry exists at a different level.
*Action:   Either remove the unique restriction or do not insert the key.  

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (2,4,0,'works4');
1 rows inserted.

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (2,5,0,'works5');
1 rows inserted.

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (2,6,1,'works6');
1 rows inserted.

  insert into childTable(parent_id, child_id, is_initial,somethingelse) values (2,7,1,'should not work');
SQL Error: ORA-00001: unique constraint (CHILDTABLE_INITIALINDEX) violated
00001. 00000 -  "unique constraint (%s.%s) violated"
*Cause:    An UPDATE or INSERT statement attempted to insert a duplicate key.
           For Trusted Oracle configured in DBMS MAC mode, you may see
           this message if a duplicate entry exists at a different level.
*Action:   Either remove the unique restriction or do not insert the key.  
  --we should only see things that work
  select * from childTable
/ 

--this should not work, since works already has the 1/1 is_initial 1
update childTable 
   set somethingelse = 'Should not work!'
     , is_initial    = 1
 where somethingelse = 'works';

SQL Error: ORA-00001: unique constraint (CHILDTABLE_INITIALINDEX) violated
00001. 00000 -  "unique constraint (%s.%s) violated"
*Cause:    An UPDATE or INSERT statement attempted to insert a duplicate key.
           For Trusted Oracle configured in DBMS MAC mode, you may see
           this message if a duplicate entry exists at a different level.
*Action:   Either remove the unique restriction or do not insert the key.

Here are the results:

PARENT_ID CHILD_ID IS_INITIAL SOMETHINGELSE                                    
--------- -------- ---------- --------------------------------------------------
        1        1          0 works                                              
        1        2          1 works3                                             
        2        4          0 works4                                             
        2        5          0 works5                                             
        2        6          1 works6  
share|improve this answer
    
@hmqcnoesy what version of Oracle are you using? –  Harrison Nov 21 '11 at 19:36
    
+1 Thanks for going the extra mile here. I guess the difference between yours and mine is that I was not repeating values for child_id. I was using that as a pk on the child table. So all your insert statements would work if your child_id values were unique. –  hmqcnoesy Nov 21 '11 at 19:43
    
@hmqcnoesy I changed it to make the unique index on the Parent_ID when the is_initial=1 (see above) –  Harrison Nov 21 '11 at 19:52
    
Yes, that's what I came up with as well, and it works the way I want, thanks to you and Chris. Your diligence is appreciated! –  hmqcnoesy Nov 21 '11 at 20:27

You can do it with a unique index:

create unique index initialindex on child(
  case when is_initial <> 1 then parent_id || 'xx' || child_id 
       else null
  end
);

Now after you try to insert a second row with is_initial = 1 you should get a constraint violation.

share|improve this answer
    
nice approach, however I believe that you want is_initial=1 and not is_initial<>1 –  Harrison Nov 21 '11 at 18:38
1  
+1 Thanks for this clever answer. But if child_id is unique, this doesn't constrain anything. Right? –  hmqcnoesy Nov 21 '11 at 19:40

Do it in a more "relational" way - don't use child.is_initial, instead use parent.initial_child_id that can be NULL, and is FOREIGN KEY toward the child table.

Since initial_child_id is in the parent table and not in the child, there can naturally be only one per parent.

Your DDL would look something like this:

CREATE TABLE parent (
    id INT,
    initial_child_id INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

CREATE TABLE child (
    child_id INT,
    parent_id INT NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (child_id)
);

ALTER TABLE parent ADD FOREIGN KEY (initial_child_id) REFERENCES child;
ALTER TABLE child ADD FOREIGN KEY (parent_id) REFERENCES parent;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great suggestion. –  hmqcnoesy Nov 21 '11 at 19:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.