Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to produce a 3NF and BCNF decomposition of a schema. I have been looking at the algorithms but I am very confused at how to do this.

If I have my minimal cover say: F' = {A->F, A->G, CF->A, BG->C) and I have identified one candidate key for the relation, say it is A. Then what exactly do I do?

I have been looking at examples, one which has the following:

F = {A → AB,A → AC,A → B,A → C,B → BC}

Minimal cover: F′ = {A → B,B → C}

And the final result was: (AB,A → B), (BC,B → C). How did they get to this?

share|improve this question

If I have my minimal cover say: F' = {A->F, A->G, CF->A, BG->C) and I have identified one candidate key for the relation, say it is A. Then what exactly do I do?

F' is not a minimal cover: you have to combine A->F and A->G to A->FG

Even worth A cannot be a candidate key given F' since B does not belong yo the closure of A. A possible candidate key would be AB.

For 3NF you start with creating tables for each one of the dependencies in F', i.e.,

R1(A,F,G) R2(A,C,F) R3(B,C,G)

Next you check whether one of the tables contains a candidate key. Since B appears only on the left side of the dependencies, B should always be a part of a candidate key. The only table with B is R3 and it does not contain candidate keys (check it!). Hence, we add a new table R4 with a candidate key as attributes

R4(A,B)

Finally, we check whether the set of attributes of one of the tables is contained in the set of attributes of another table. This is not the case for our running example.

Hence, our 3NF decomposition is

  R1(A,F,G) R2(A,C,F) R3(B,C,G)  R4(A,B)

For BCNF you start with R(A,B,C,F,G) and look for BCNF violations.

For instance A->FG is a violation of BCNF because this dependency is not trivial and A is not a superkey. Hence we split R into

R1(A,F,G) and R2(A,B,C)

None of the relations obtained contains BCNF violations, so the process stops here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.