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Right, so I've got an example website I'm making, and I'm using mostly jQuery. On my footer, I'm getting it to animate on click, and I've got it to change the ID of the footer after the click and animation has happened. But when I click it again (to carry out the jQuery commands of the new ID) it doesn't work. it appears that none of the jQuery code is excecuted after the change of ID. Here is the code used:

This is the code to change the ID in the first instance:

$("#footer").click(function(){
    $("#footercontent").animate({height:"200px"});
    $("#footer").attr("id", "footerclose");

This is the code to change the ID back:

$("#footerclose").click(function(){
    $("#footercontent").animate({height:"1px"});
    $("#footercontent").hide();
    $("#footerclose").attr("id", "footer");
});

This is the CSS for the footer content:

#footercontent {
    width:990px;
    height:1px;
    text-align:center;
    background-color:#FFF;
    padding:5px;
    box-shadow:inset 0 0 25px #000;
    border:0px;
}

And this is the footer and footerclose CSS:

#footer {
    color:#999;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    z-index:99;
    width:150px;
    height:30px;
    border:0px;
    padding:5px;
}

#footerclose {
    color:#999;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    width:150px;
    height:30px;
    border:0px;
    padding:5px;

You can find the site in question here: http://epicgiggle.co.uk/test/example/

I've looked everywhere and there is no solution.

Help is much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you're changing the id instead of adding/removing a class? It seems like you're making unnecessary complications for yourself... –  nrabinowitz Nov 21 '11 at 18:36
    
Well, I suppose I knew you could remove a class/id but I didn't know you could change them, It's probably over complicated, but I don't really know where to use classes and ids. Not really that much difference is there? –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 18:39
1  
@user1058361 - id's have to be unique. –  Daniel A. White Nov 21 '11 at 18:40
    
You are making a common mistake: in-line statements are ran even before the previous one is finished. You should put the id change (as mentioned, there have to be unique in the entire page or children within it -- if you load content to a div where new ids are present, they cannot conflict with existing ones) as a call back after the animation: $("#footer").click(function(){ $("#footercontent").animate({height:"200px"},timing, function () { $("#footer").attr("id", "footerclose") }); –  zequinha-bsb Nov 21 '11 at 18:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use jQuery live because the element is not present on the page when you try to attach click event handler.

Try this

$("#footer").live('click', function(){
    $("#footercontent").animate({height:"200px"});
    $("#footer").attr("id", "footerclose");
});

$("#footerclose").live('click', function(){
    $("#footercontent").animate({height:"1px"});
    $("#footercontent").hide();
    $("#footerclose").attr("id", "footer");
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to both of you. :) –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 18:50

You're trying to bind the .click() handler to #footerclose in $(document).ready(). But there's no element with that id at that point in time, so the handler doesn't get bound to anything.

You can fix this with your current approach by using .delegate(), e.g.:

$(body).delegate('#footerclose', 'click', function() { ... });

As noted by @JonathanG, in jQuery 1.7 this should use .on() instead:

$(body).on('click', '#footerclose', function() { ... })

But to be honest, I wouldn't do it this way - I think you'd have a much easier time just using .toggle() (docs):

$('#footer').toggle(
   function() {
       // animate open, add a class to change the CSS
   },
   function() {
       // close, remove the class
   }
);
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, so can where can I put the jquery code for #footerclose? after the $(document).ready() section, start a new section? –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 18:40
    
OP should use jQuery.live or bind the event as part of the id changing logic. Additionally it would be better to use a class instead of an ID. –  prodigitalson Nov 21 '11 at 18:42
1  
Important to note that for jQuery 1.7 and forward, both .live() and .delegate() have been superseded by .on(). However, for versions prior to 1.7, .delegate is still recommended. –  BumbleShrimp Nov 21 '11 at 18:44
    
@JonathonG - thanks, added to the answer. –  nrabinowitz Nov 21 '11 at 18:48
    
Thanks to both of you. :) –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 18:48

Somewhat unrelated, but, you can do some code optimization. For example each of the following selectors all do the same thing (.hide();):

$("#homecontent").hide();
$("#aboutcontent").hide();
$("#contactcontent").hide();
$("#othercontent").hide();
$("#footercontent").hide();

This can be turned into:

$("#homecontent, #aboutcontent, #contactcontent, #othercontent, #footercontent").hide();

Also, .css() (as well as .animate();) attributes can be combined. So this:

$("#aboutcontent").css({height:"10px"});
$("#aboutcontent").css({width:"490px"});

could be turned into:

$("#aboutcontent").css({ height:"10px", width: "490px" });

These aren't limited to just these examples. There are multiple places where your ID's do the same thing (like .hide();), where you can combine the selectors.

Finally, I would suggest using variables. Each time you do something like $("#homecontent"), jQuery goes out and searches the page for anything with an ID of "homecontent". However, with a variable, such as var homecontent = $("#homecontent"), you cache that selector, so it doesn't have to be searched for it each time. It will work faster as well as be more readable for you. If you did this, your jQuery lines would look something like this:

homecontent.css({ height:"10px", width:"240px" });
etc etc...
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, yes. I thought someone would point that out on here :P Thank you. And is var used in the jquery file? (probably a stupid question)... Is there a link to a file with examples of this? Thank you btw. :) –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 18:57
    
Yes, you could put the var after the $(document).ready(function(){ . Here's a link that describes variables pretty in depth: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/site/67defydd –  motoxer4533 Nov 21 '11 at 19:05
    
Ahh, I see. I do computing at college and some of the code is similar to that of Visual Basic.net we use. Makes sense and it's logical. :P Thanks again. My code could be so much better. :3 –  Rob Booth Nov 21 '11 at 19:09

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