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I'm building a social network. For each user, I'm going to expect a lot of information about them. Relationship status, work, hometown, school, etc. I'm sure these profile attributes will grow and grow in the future.

Should I store them all on 1 table, with each attribute as a column?

Or should I create 1 table for "user profile", with the basic information...and then have other tables (school table, relationship table, work table, etc) Foreign Key to that?

My question is: What is the best practice when separating into multiple tables?

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1  
"Best practice" is one of those words that can mean whatever you want it to. You probably want to think about how you would recognize a "good" solution to the problem. For instance, do you want to optimize for performance? Scalability? Maintainability? Extensibility? What kind of queries do you expect to run? Is "relationship status" going to be used in a search query? –  Neville K Nov 21 '11 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way to do this is to store the user attributes in a table separate from the main "user" table. This attribute table would have three columns, "user id", "attribute type", and "value". The attribute type can be some identifier that specifies whatever attribute you like (hometown, school, etc).

User table
------------
UserId
Name

UserAttribute table
---------------------
UserId
AttributeId
Value

Attribute table
------------------
AttributeId
AttributeName

Once you have this structure set up, adding a new attribute is as simple as adding a new row to the Attribute table describing the attribute. Then fill in the attribute for users in the UserAttribute table as needed. No need for expensive ALTER TABLE operations to add new columns.

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just beat me to it –  Prescott Nov 21 '11 at 18:50
    
What Query would I run in order to get "all the attributes" for a user? –  TIMEX Nov 21 '11 at 18:56
    
select AttributeId, Value from UserAttribute where UserId = <whatever> This will return multiple rows, one for each attribute. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 21 '11 at 19:07
    
@GregHewgill what if the "value" is different for different attributes? Eg. "About me" is obviously TEXT , whereas "is_married" would be Boolean...? –  TIMEX Nov 22 '11 at 19:42
    
@TIMEX: This scheme as I showed it is limited to a single type of attribute. You can of course store boolean values in a string type, as '1' and '0' or 'true' and 'false' or whatever you like. Or, with some extra work you can modify this scheme to be able to store different typed values in the UserAttribute table (but this may not be worth the effort). –  Greg Hewgill Nov 22 '11 at 20:42

Best practice (in my opinion) is to have relational database design.

Users Table
-----------
 UserId
 RelationshipId
 StatusId
 WorkId
 HometownId
 SchoolId

Relationships Table
-----------
 RelationshipId
 RelationshipText

etc...

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User
    UserId
    Name
    OtherRelativelyStraighforwardUserInformation

Attribute
    AttributeId
    AttributeText

UserAttributes
    UserId
    AttributeId
    Value

This allows you to expand your attributes relatively easily without having to modify your schema. There are issues if your attributes might be text vs integer vs something else, so it's not perfect, but it's pretty simple.

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