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I need to get a native installer for Mac and Linux from an .air file. I'm on Windows and using AIR 2.5 .

I came across this interesting Windows application to convert an .air file to .exe/.dmg/.rpm. I can not get it to work so did somebody else used it and can proof the functionality or can recommend a similiar app?

Thanks. Uli

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4 Answers

Here is an article from adobe to accomplish what you're trying to do here:

http://help.adobe.com/en_US/air/build/WS789ea67d3e73a8b22388411123785d839c-8000.html

I'm not sure if there are other applications that automate this process for you. There were a couple back when this functionality was first in beta but I think they're pretty much gone or incompatible. See here for a tutorial:

http://bishoponvsto.wordpress.com/2010/02/23/adobe-air-2beta-2-to-exe-packaging-air-app-in-windows-executable/

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From the Air docs: "You must use ADT on the same operating system as that of the native installer file you want to generate."

I develop on a Mac and run Windows via bootcamp and with this setup I've been able to create native installers for both operating systems. Also it's worth noting that Adobe has abandoned support for Linux as for v2.6 so this may influence to what amount of trouble you're willing to go through to build an .rpm

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you should use adt command.

adt -package -target native myApp.dmg myApp.air for MAC

and

adt -package -target native myApp.exe myApp.air fr Windows
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Why not take a look at this article on NativeProcess functionality, it describes the process of creating a native installer. To quote some relevant portions:

To package the application, invoke the ADT application using syntax to package a native installer application version.

You must run ADT on the same operating system as the target installer application. To generate a DMG file, run ADT on Mac OS. To generate an EXE installer file, run ADT on Windows.

For example, the following command packages a DMG file on Mac OS:
adt -package -storetype pkcs12 -keystore myCert.p12 -target native NativeProcessTest.dmg NativeProcessTest-app.xml NativeProcessTest.swf NativeApps/Mac/bin/echoTestMac icons

Before running this command, open the Terminal application and navigate to the output directory for your Flex project. Adjust the following:

    The path to the ADT application in the Flex SDK
    The name and path of the signing certificate (given as myCert.p12 in this example)

For example, the following command packages an EXE installer file on Windows:
adt -package -storetype pkcs12 -keystore myCert.p12 -target native NativeProcessTest.exe NativeProcessTest-app.xml NativeProcessTest.swf NativeApps/Windows/bin/echoTestWindows icons

Before running this command, open a command line session and navigate to the output directory for your Flex project. Adjust the following:

    The path to the ADT application in the Flex SDK
    The name and path of the signing certificate (given as myCert.p12 in this example)

For more information on using ADT and on using signing certificates, refer to "Packaging an AIR application in a native installer" in Building Adobe AIR applications.

Captive Runtime will do something similar, but requires AIR 3 or later.

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The NativeProcess class is for launching native processes (that article talks about packaging a native mac/win executable in the installer and calling it from an AIR app) and is the brute-force way to do this kind of thing before ANEs were available. Captive runtime support is only available on AIR 3, and doesn't support Linux and you need to package the app on a mac to build a native mac application (and the same for windows) –  32bitkid Nov 21 '11 at 19:01
    
@32bitkid As part of the NativeProcess functionality, you can create Native installers. You're right about Linux; I missed that part of the question. –  JeffryHouser Nov 21 '11 at 19:29
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The NativeProcess functionality has nothing to do with the process of creating a bundled runtime application or a standalone executable installer. I think you've confused this for the fact that the NativeProcess function DEPENDS explicitly on having your AIR app packaged as a native installer/executable. –  Technik Empire Nov 21 '11 at 22:17
    
@Ascension Systems You're right; there is a distinction there that was not clear in my post. –  JeffryHouser Nov 21 '11 at 22:34
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