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I get the following output:

Pushkin - 100500 
Gogol - 23 
Dostoyevsky - 9999

Which is the result of the following script:

for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
    echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done   

All I want is to get the output like this:

Pushkin - 100500 
Dostoyevsky - 9999
Gogol - 23

which means that the keys in associative array should be sorted by value. Is there an easy method to do so?

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I didn't know that you can use associative array within bash. –  Luc M Nov 21 '11 at 19:15
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can easily sort your output, in descending numerical order of the 3rd field:

for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
    echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done |
sort -rn -k3

See sort(1) for more about the sort command. This just sorts output lines; I don't know of any way to sort an array directly in bash.

I also can't see how the above can give you names ("Pushkin" et al.) as array keys. In bash, array keys are always integers.

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5  
Bash 4.0 adds associative arrays where the keys can be strings. –  Michael Hoffman Nov 21 '11 at 19:34
1  
Well I'll be... you're right. It just needs declare -A authors. –  Andrew Schulman Nov 21 '11 at 21:39
    
Your solution works. As far as I understand, it just sorts output strings, not the contents of the associative array, but anyway, the output produced is what I need. –  Graf Nov 22 '11 at 8:44
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Alternatively you can sort the indexes and use the sorted list of indexes to loop through the array:

authors_indexes=( ${!authors[@]} )
IFS=$'\n' authors_sorted=( $(echo -e "${authors_indexes[@]/%/\n}" | sed -r -e 's/^ *//' -e '/^$/d' | sort) )

for k in "${authors_sorted[@]}"; do
  echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done 
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