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I'm aware that STL associative containers (and other containers being sorted I would guess) use the sorting criterion to test for equality.

The sorting criterion for containers defaults to st::less, so that would make the equality test for a container:

if (! (lhs < rhs || rhs < lhs))

or something similar. I had a couple questions about this...

First of all, it seems like a strangely inefficient way to compare for equality - why does the STL do it like this? I would have expected STL containers to just take an extra default parameter for equality instead.

My second question is more about the evaluation of the if statement above in general. In C++, how much of that statement would be evaluated (lhs > rhs) was true? Would it stop trying after evaluating the side that failed thus saving some efficiency? If so, which part of the expression is evaluated first?

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That's equivalence, not equality... –  K-ballo Nov 21 '11 at 20:17
    
@K-ballo what's the difference? –  curiousguy Nov 22 '11 at 6:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In "Effective STL," Scott Meyers has an extensive discussion about this in Item 19:

Understand the difference between equality and equivalence.

Equality, as you might expect, is based on operator==.

Equivalence "is based on the relative ordering of object values in a sorted range... Two objects have eqivalent values in a container c if neither precedes the other in c's sort order."

Meyers expresses it this way:

!( w1 < w2 ) // it's not true that w1 < w2
&&           // and
!( w2 < w1 ) // it's not true that w2 < w1

Meyers then restates:

This makes sense: two values are equivalent (with respect to some ordering criterion) if neither precedes the other (according to that criterion.)

As for why the STL does it this way:

By using only a single comparison function and by employing equivalence as the arbiter of what it means to be "the same," the standard associative containers... avoid the kind of confusion that would arise from mixing uses of equality and equivalence within standard associative containers.

Read Item 19 (which spans the better part of 6 pages) for yourself to get the full flavor.

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"This makes sense: two values are equivalent (with respect to some ordering criterion) if neither precedes the other (according to that criterion.)" No, it makes sense because the requirement for using the sorted containers is that it makes sense. –  curiousguy Nov 21 '11 at 20:16
    
You're downvoting me for quoting Scott Meyers? –  Gnawme Nov 21 '11 at 20:20
    
Exactly. "This makes sense: ..." is meaningless and potentially misleading. –  curiousguy Nov 21 '11 at 20:23
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He's talking about why equivalence is expressed using !(w1<w2) && !(w2<w1); his "This makes sense" statement refers to that. –  Gnawme Nov 21 '11 at 20:28
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@curiousguy: never mind that comment. The strict weak ordering requirement (see also C++ standard, I can't quote it verse and chapter) gives rise to an equivalence relation on its own: those x and y for which neither x < y nor y < x, exactly what Meyers gives. –  larsmans Nov 21 '11 at 22:00

STL associative containers

You mean: standard C++ sorted associative containers.

I would have expected STL containers to just take an extra default parameter for equality instead.

What would that achieve? In your textbook red-black tree algorithm, instead of

if (x < y)
    // ...
else if (y < x)
    // ...
else
    // equality

you'd have

if (x == y)
    // equality
else if (x < y)
    // ...
else
    // y < x

so still two comparisons in the worst case.

Responding to the comments to this answer: having only a less-than operator to supply makes the containers substantially easier to use, since there's no need to maintain consistency between less-than and equals. Let's imagine you have a program storing floating point numbers. One day, someone decides to replace the bitwise-equality float_equals function, that just happened to be used by some container but also by their code, by an approximate comparison. If that person doesn't update the float_less function, because their code doesn't use that function, then your container code mysteriously breaks.

(Oh and in the example code shown, short-circuiting applies, as always.)

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And this eliminates subtle bugs that might arise if the less-than and equality operators didn't agree 100%. –  Mark Ransom Nov 21 '11 at 20:04
    
"this eliminates subtle bugs that might arise if the less-than and equality operators didn't agree 100%." and it creates subtle bugs if the less-than operator doesn't agree with itself. ;) –  curiousguy Nov 21 '11 at 20:18
    
@MarkRansom: very true, added that to the answer. –  larsmans Nov 21 '11 at 20:57

Regarding the second question: Standard C lazy evaluation rules for boolean expressions apply. If the LHS of || is true, the RHS is not evaluated.

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C++ evaluates if() left to right for your case with ||. Evaluates left side (lhs < rhs) - If it's true and it's not a compound statement (it's not in your case), it evaluates the whole if as true without checking the right side. (Then indeed returns negated value since there's not in front of it.) If it's false then it moves on to the right side (rhs < lhs) and evaluates that and then the whole expression.

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"C++ evaluates if() left to right." Wrong. Only a && b, a || b, a, b, a ? b : c are evaluated left-to-right. –  curiousguy Nov 21 '11 at 20:05
    
You're incorrect fine sir. a ? b : c is evaluated right to left. Also, i was referring to his <code>||</code> which is indeed evaluated in left side then right side manner. –  ScarletAmaranth Nov 21 '11 at 20:11
    
"You're incorrect fine sir. a ? b : c is evaluated right to left" What do you mean? In which order are a, b, and c evaluated according to you? "i was referring to his <code>||</code> which is indeed evaluated in left side then right side manner." in a potentially very misleading way. –  curiousguy Nov 21 '11 at 20:21
    
ScarletAmaranth, you have the right to admit that you were wrong. –  curiousguy Nov 23 '11 at 5:08

First of all, it seems like a strangely inefficient way to compare for equality

Yes, but sorted containers do this test relatively rarely.

Using a compare function like strcmp would be better. Using both less-than and compare would be still better.

In C++, how much of that statement would be evaluated (lhs > rhs) was true?

In C and in C++, a && b, a || b, a, b, a ? b : c are evaluated left-to-right, with only the useful right part evaluated (except for overloaded &&, ||, , operators in C++).

This allows several useful short tests like: p != NULL && *p > 2

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