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I have

int y = (arc4random()%4)+1;

So it generates a random number from 1 to 4.

I wanted to ask if there's a way to leave number 3 out so only numbers 1, 2 and 4 have a chance to get generated.

Thank you!

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do it in a loop until it generates a number that ISN'T 3? –  Marc B Nov 21 '11 at 20:19
2  
@MarcB: That could take arbitrarily long. –  undur_gongor Nov 21 '11 at 20:53
    
The execution time of a loop that breaks on a random number is indefinite and it adds unnecessary indeterminism. –  dreamlax Nov 21 '11 at 22:04
    
Why is 3 bad? Are you sure you're trying to solve the right problem? –  todofixthis Nov 21 '11 at 23:33

5 Answers 5

int allowdNumbers[3] = {1, 2, 4}
int index = arc4random()%3;

int number = allowdNumbers[index];
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I would do this: int index = arc4random_uniform(sizeof(allowdNumbers)/sizeof(int));. You can also use int allowdNumbers[] = {1, 2, 4}; without the 3. –  user142019 Nov 22 '11 at 14:44

You can always make a random from 0-2 (arc4random() % 3) and use that number with 2 as a power:

2^0 = 1
2^1 = 2
2^2 = 4

and there you got your random from 1-4 without 3. In C:

int y = 1 << (arc4random() % 3);
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4  
+1 That's a good idea ;) –  Marlon Nov 21 '11 at 20:25
1  
great solution) –  beryllium Nov 21 '11 at 20:25
1  
The good with this is that you don't need any other structure to help you get the random number you need or any other logical checks. A simple math calculation. –  DarkRift Nov 21 '11 at 20:34
1  
... and the bad thing is that in each call of random(...) you will have a raise_to_power(...) op which in general is expensive. –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Nov 21 '11 at 20:43
1  
0x69: I hope you're joking... for integer powers of 2, you can just bitshift the integer rather than using pow or powf, and bitshifting is typically a very cheap operation. –  dreamlax Nov 21 '11 at 20:46

Generate a random number from 0 to the number of different numbers you have (exclusive, and in your case, 3), and distribute the result according to your preference. In your case:

int y = (rand() % 3) + 1;

if (y == 3)
    y++;
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Assuming you want numbers that correspond to powers of two, then this should work nicely.

int y = 1 << arc4random_uniform(3);

If you want to leave out 3 for some other reason, then that would probably to more to obfuscate what you are doing than. In that case, something more straightforward would suffice.

do {
    int y = arc4random_uniform(4) + 1;
} while (y == 3);
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5  
That loop is not a good idea at all. Loops that run indefinitely waiting for a random number to occur are rarely (if at all) a good idea. –  dreamlax Nov 21 '11 at 20:39
    
In general, yes. If this particular loop that filters out one of four possibilities is a problem, then you need a new random function. –  Matt Nov 22 '11 at 13:02

You can do this:

int y = (arc4random()%3)+1;
if (y == 3) y =4;

Though you should arc4random_uniform instead of the modulo operator.

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This isn't truly random then, because there will be a greater amount of "4"'s being generated, as both values "3" and "4" will be changed to "4". –  qegal Sep 12 '12 at 1:42
    
@qegal look more closely. The first line will never make y equal 4. –  user1203803 Sep 12 '12 at 11:23
    
@daknøk - Sorry; I guess I just skimmed over it. –  qegal Sep 12 '12 at 11:27

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