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POSIX.1e was going to define ACL (Access Control List) mechanisms for POSIX (amongst other security-related issues), but the proposals were never converted to a formal standard. Nevertheless, ACLs (not necessarily POSIX.1e ACLs) are supported at least optionally in all the main variants of Unix (Linux, BSD, MacOS X(ACL), HP-UX, AIX (p107ff), Solaris). One detail I've not yet spotted being discussed is how ACLs on files interact with the sticky bit on a directory.

With a normal directory (no ACLs around to confuse the issue), the permissions can be set to, for example, 1777 (found on /tmp, for example).

drwxrwxrwt  16 root     sys         4819 May  4 12:09 /tmp

The sticky bit is indicated by the 't' in the last position of the permissions. It means that a user can only delete a file from the directory if the user can write to the file. This makes sense; if the user can write to the file, the contents of the file can be destroyed.

My question is:

  • Suppose the general (non-ACL) permissions of the /tmp directory are as illustrated above.
  • Further suppose that a paranoid user, 'trembler', sets the non-ACL permissions on a file /tmp/secret to 600 (user 'trembler', group 'worried').
  • Suppose that 'trembler' grants 'rw' access on /tmp/secret to another user, 'blase' via an ACL that cites 'blase' specifically.
  • Can 'blase' delete the file /tmp/secret

If the ACL is taken into account, the answer should be 'yes'; if the ACL is ignored, the answer would be 'no'. Assuming that ACLs are enabled on the relevant file system, is the behaviour uniform across all Unix variants?

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Assuming that ACLs are enabled on the relevant file system, is the behaviour uniform across all Unix variants?

As ACLs are not implemented uniformly across Unix variants I would expect the behaviour may differ across Unix variants, but it does not have to. Unless all Unices implement the same (standard) way of ACL, there is IMHO no way to guarantee a uniform behaviour across all Unix variants.

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