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In numpy/scipy I have an image stored in an array. I can display it, I want to save it using savefig without any borders, axes, labels, titles,... Just pure image, nothing else.

I want to avoid packages like PyPNG or scipy.misc.imsave, they are sometimes problematic (they do not always install well, only basic savefig() for me

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3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Assuming :

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

To make a figure without the frame :

fig = plt.figure(frameon=False)
fig.set_size_inches(w,h)

To make the content fill the whole figure

ax = plt.Axes(fig, [0., 0., 1., 1.])
ax.set_axis_off()
fig.add_axes(ax)

Then draw your image on it :

ax.imshow(your_image, aspect='normal')
fig.savefig(fname, dpi)

The aspect parameter changes the pixel size to make sure they fill the figure size specified in fig.set_size_inches(…). To get a feel of how to play with this sort of things, read through matplotlib's documentation, particularly on the subject of Axes, Axis and Artist.

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2  
nope, I still have some small transparent border, and what I want is no border at all, pure image –  Jakub M. Nov 21 '11 at 21:42
    
Maybe, it's because I forgot about the case where the image is not square :P. Just edited to add the aspect param. How's it now? –  matehat Nov 21 '11 at 21:49
1  
grrr, no, still the same. There is a small, transparent border around the image, few pixels on each side –  Jakub M. Nov 21 '11 at 21:58
1  
almost! I figured out that the border was added by bbox_inches='tight'. But, now the images instead of desired 24x24px are 800x600px. Still looking... –  Jakub M. Nov 21 '11 at 22:05
    
If you manually set the w and h parameters in fig.set_size_inches(w,h) and the dpi parameter in fig.savefig(fname, dpi) so that it result in 24px by 24px, it should work just fine. For example, w = h = 1 and dpi = 24 –  matehat Nov 21 '11 at 22:27

An easier solution seems to be:

fig.savefig('out.png', bbox_inches='tight', pad_inches=0)
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1  
This worked out great for me. Also, pad_inches can be changed to desired size easily. Thanks! –  Curious2learn Dec 31 '12 at 16:46
    
+1 worked out great for me too :) And this is actually way simpler than the accepted answer –  El Ninja Trepador Apr 10 at 22:26

You can find the bbox of the image inside the axis (using get_window_extent), and use the bbox_inches parameter to save only that portion of the image:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data=np.arange(9).reshape((3,3))
fig=plt.figure()
ax=fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
plt.axis('off')
plt.imshow(data)

extent = ax.get_window_extent().transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
plt.savefig('/tmp/test.png', bbox_inches=extent)

I learned this trick from Joe Kington here.

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