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I am trying to compare a user input to every element of a list, where NL is the list, but for some reason it never enters the else loop.

NL = range(1, sc.NLayer + 1)

if (x for x in NL if x < sc.NLayer): 
    print 'true'
else:
    print 'false'

sc.NLayer is user input.

assume sc.NLayer = 5; it is not hitting the else condition . Please help

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I don't understand what this code is trying to check for. Could you explain it in plain English? –  Matti Virkkunen Nov 21 '11 at 21:22
    
I could tell you why it behaves the way it does, but Matti's right: To solve your actual problem, we need to understand what you're trying to do, and as your code is currently rather meaningless, it would be best if you explained what you want. –  delnan Nov 21 '11 at 21:24
    
I am trying to compare a user input to every element of a list , where NL is the list –  bharath Nov 21 '11 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to use the built in any function.

any([True, False, 0, []])
=> True

So in your code, it would be:

if any(x for x in NL if x < sc.NLayer):
    print 'true'
else:
    print 'false'

or possibly a for loop:

for x in NL:
    if x < sc.NLayer:
        print 'true'
    else:
        print 'false'
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Your first code sample shows True when one of the inputs is True. It is important to note that unlike and and or, any() and all() are not coalescing. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 21 '11 at 21:28
    
Oops! Good point! Fixed. –  TorelTwiddler Nov 21 '11 at 21:43

Yeah, no.

if any(x for x in NL if x <sc.NLayer): 
  print 'true'
else:
  print 'false'
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In case it's not clear from the other responses, your problem lies here:

if (x for x in NL if x < sc.NLayer):

In this syntax you've created what is known as a generator expression, which is like a list comprehension, but it instead returns a generator. A generator itself is a complex object, and therefore if returned it will always evaluate to True. Generators have their own protocol in which you must explicitly retrieve items one at a time. When iterating this is not immediately obvious because iteration automatically does this for you, but when evaluating it is distinct.

Conversely, if you were to actually perform this as a list comprehension, you should get the desired result, because an empty list ([]) evaluates to False! I think that's closer to what you want.

Here is a simple example to illustrate by evaluating the contents of mylist with a list comprehension that will return an empty list:

>>> mylist = range(10)
>>> [x for x in mylist if x == 'a']  
[]

There's your empty list. Now evaluate that with bool() and observe that it is False:

>>> bool([x for x in mylist if x == 'a'])
False

Ok, so what if you evaluate it instead as a generator expression:

>>> (x for x in mylist if x == 'a')
<generator object <genexpr> at 0xb7ebc644>
>>> bool((x for x in mylist if x == 'a'))
True

And for illustration, if you cast this generator expression to a list, you can see that it does in fact have no results:

>>> list((x for x in mylist if x == 'a'))
[]

I hope that helps!

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