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I'd like to know if there is any way of solving the following problem in an efficient manner. I have a collection of X-Y points. For each point I need to generate a certain number of records and, finally, I need to stack together all those records being generated. Initially I was doing it with a FOR loop and using cbind to stack data.frame at each cycle. Right now changed it a little bit by defining the dimensions of the final record stack and am trying to replace those 0's with the generated values. My code is posted below (with an ** I point out where I got stuck)..if you can give me a hint on that or even have a better solution it would be perfect!

colonies <- read.table(text =             
'  X        Y      Timecount ID_col Age
582906.4 2883317      2004      1  15
583345.9 2883102      2004      2   4
583119.5 2883621      2004      3  13
583385.0 2882933      2004      4   5
583374.0 2882936      2004      5   2
583271.0 2883076      2004      7   5
582898.9 2883229      2004      8   1
582927.9 2883234      2004      9  20
582956.7 2883272      2004     10  13
582958.8 2883249      2004     11   3', header = TRUE)

year = 2004
survival_prob = 0.01
male_prob = 0.5

Present <- colonies$Timecount == year

app <- sum(colonies$Age[Present] >= 4 & colonies$Age[Present] < 10) * 1000 * survival_prob
app2 <- sum(colonies$Age[Present] >= 10 & colonies$Age[Present] < 15) * 10000 * survival_prob
app3 <- sum(colonies$Age[Present] >= 15 & colonies$Age[Present] <= 20) * 100000 * survival_prob

size <- app + app2 + app3

pop <- data.frame(matrix(0,nrow=size,ncol=2))
colnames(pop) <- c("X","Y")

if (dim(pop)[1] > 0){

 #FOR cycle going through each existing point
 for (i in 1:sum(Present)){     

   if (colonies[Present,]$Age[i] < 4) { next
   } else if (colonies[Present,]$Age[i] >= 4 & colonies[Present,]$Age[i] < 10) { alates <- 1000 
   } else if (colonies[Present,]$Age[i] >= 10 & colonies[Present,]$Age[i] < 15) { alates <- 10000 
    } else if (colonies[Present,]$Age[i] >= 15 & colonies[Present,]$Age[i] <= 20) { alates <- 100000 
    }

    indiv <- alates * survival_prob
    #Initialize two coordinate variables based on the established (or existing) colonies
    X_temp <- round(colonies[Present,]$X[i],2)
    Y_temp <- round(colonies[Present,]$Y[i],2)
    distance <- rexp(indiv,rate=1/200)
    theta <- runif(indiv, 0, 2*pi)
    C <- cos(theta)
    S <- sin(theta)
    #XY coords (meters) using polar coordinate transformations
    X <- X_temp + round(S * distance,2)
    Y <- Y_temp + round(C * distance,2)
    pop[,] <- c(X,Y) #******HERE I GOT STUCK...it should be pop[1:indiv,] 
                     #but then it does not work for the next i since it would over write...

    }
    pop$Sex <- rbinom(size,1,male_prob)
    pop$ID <- 1:dim(pop)[1]
}
share|improve this question
    
The code seems problematic... Do you really want to do nothing with under 4 age? If so, toss it immediately. It seems to me that this can all be vectorized. Please comment it much better and perhaps provide a better description of what you want to accomplish. –  John Nov 22 '11 at 0:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe that this is what you were looking for, nice expressive vectorized R code. There are no loops, not even *apply family or plyr commands. You could do a variety of things to make it more flexible but the core vectorization using rep, and single calls to your random distances is pretty critical. I have no idea why there was an if clause for the dimensions of pop. You need to handle that differently because it's not made to the end.

year = 2004
survival_prob = 0.01
male_prob = 0.5

# you don't do anything in your for loop or save any of the results if the age is 
# less than 4. I'm going to just remove that from colonies on the assumption that it's 
# larger than posted and comes from a file that you won't change.  Where I edit 
# colonies you might want to work with a copy.
colonies <- colonies[colonies$Age >= 4,]

# only Present selection of colonies is ever used in this code so you could also stop 
# repeatedly selecting... this one I'm imagining you might make a copy of, something 
# like coloniesP in your real code.  In general, you want as little going on in a 
# loop and as little repeating yourself as possible.  Note, this might be memory 
# intensive if colonies is actually very large.  Feel free to going back to selecting 
# since it would happen much less frequently in the new code anyway.
Present <- colonies$Timecount == year
colonies <- colonies[Present,]

# no difference up to size, then it all is
app <- sum(colonies$Age >= 4 & colonies$Age < 10) * 1000 * survival_prob
app2 <- sum(colonies$Age >= 10 & colonies$Age < 15) * 10000 * survival_prob
app3 <- sum(colonies$Age >= 15 & colonies$Age <= 20) * 100000 * survival_prob

size <- app + app2 + app3

#note that ifelse can be used to declare alates as vectors
alates <- ifelse(colonies$Age >= 4 & colonies$Age < 10, 1000, 100000)
alates <- ifelse(colonies$Age >= 10 & colonies$Age < 15, 10000, alates)

# as a consequence, more stuff can be vectorized
indiv <- alates * survival_prob

# we can do some cool stuff with rep to continue vectorizing
# (round when done if you must)
X_temp <- rep(colonies$X, indiv)
Y_temp <- rep(coloines$Y, indiv)

#Initialize two coordinate variables based on the established (or existing) colonies... now as vectors of the entire data frame size
distance <- rexp(size,rate=1/200)
theta <- runif(size, 0, 2*pi)
C <- cos(theta)
S <- sin(theta)
#XY coords (meters) using polar coordinate transformations
X <- X_temp + S * distance
Y <- Y_temp + C * distance
pop <- data.frame(X,Y)  
pop$Sex <- rbinom(size,1,male_prob)
pop$ID <- 1:dim(pop)[1]
# now round... once
pop$X <- round(pop$X,2)
pop$Y <- round(pop$Y,2)

In addition, you might want to note that even if it couldn't be vectorized there's a solution to your problem with assigning the values into pop that's very simple.. don't. Just use lapply on a function that returns a data.frame and bind the list of data.frame objects afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John!! The lapply version is something I tested already but when I go stack all list elements together it takes longer that the current loop I have...The solution you wrote here though is working perfectly...I really appreciate it...is there any chance I can contact you via email? Francesco –  Francesco Nov 22 '11 at 19:55

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